fritillary

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Related to fritillaries: Fritillaria

fritillary

[frə′til·ə·rē]
(botany)
The common name for plants of the genus Fritillaria.
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for butterflies in several genera of the subfamily Nymphalinae.
References in periodicals archive ?
A National Collection of 120 different fritillaries, open by appointment, is held by Kevin Pratt at Hazel Grove, Stockport, Cheshire (0161-456-9009).
Butterfly conservation staff, volunteers and contractors have just completed a fieldwork project at Clocaenog Forest, near Ruthin, to assess the population of this smallest of the fritillaries.
THERE are about 100 different species of fritillaries and I wish I could grow them all.
Make the drive to see fab fritillaries 6 I enjoyed your article on fritillaries and wanted to say that one of the best displays is on the driveway at Kelmarsh Hall in Northamptonshire.
Small pearl-bordered fritillaries live in woodland clearings where trees have recently been cut down or coppiced, and where there are areas of grass, bracken and open scrub.
Snake's head fritillaries look good in groups in the centre of small containers, or combined with crocus in bowls oversown with grass to create a miniature naturalistic meadow in a bowl.
QI ENJOYED your article on fritillaries and wanted to say that one of the best displays is on the driveway at Kelmarsh Hall in Northamptonshire.
Rare spring species such as grizzled skippers, pearlbordered fritillaries and wood whites have been up to a month late after a lingering winter which saw the second coldest March on record followed by an icy start to April.
The seven-hectare Myers Allotment reserve is already home to a small population of high brown fritillaries and Butterfly Conservation hopes its work to establish woodland corridors, glades and coppiced areas will boost numbers of the insect.
Like the fritillaries, swallowtails serve to represent the butterfly fauna that associates with the major vegetational communities across Nebraska, and they serve as indicators of change resulting from European settlement.