frontal lobe

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Related to frontal cortex: amygdala, Prefrontal cortex, Hippocampus

frontal lobe

[¦frənt·əl ¦lōb]
(neuroscience)
The anterior portion of a cerebral hemisphere, bounded behind by the central sulcus and below by the lateral cerebral sulcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Friedman suggests that the rise in anxiety and depression in adolescents is directly correlated to the fact that the frontal cortex in adolescents is not well developed and therefore doesn't permit the kind of top-down control we expect to see in adults.
Their uterus, frontal cortex, and hippocampus were dissected out and kept at -80[degrees]C until use.
Seeing "Jesus in toast" reflects our brain's normal functioning and the active role that the frontal cortex plays in visual perception.
The results of the initial screening with these 3 antibodies (tau, ubiquitin or p62, and TDP-43) on 2 sections each, frontal cortex and hippocampus, will in most cases allow the general pathologist to subclassify the FTLD.
They also observed decreased activity in the lateral orbital frontal cortex, a region involved in satiety.
The brain has a taste center, a smell center and an orbital frontal cortex center where taste and smell sensations are integrated into the perception of a single flavor.
The frontal cortex of the brain and underlying white matter connections between the frontal cortex and circuits of reward, motivation and memory are fundamental in the manifestations of altered impulse control, altered judgment, and the dysfunctional pursuit of rewards (which is often experienced by the affected person as a desire to "be normal") seen in addiction--despite cumulative adverse consequences experienced from engagement in substance use and other addictive behaviors.
Researchers have found that insomniacs experience an increase in metabolism in the brain's frontal cortex.
fMRI results indicated that both children and adults with FASD showed greater activity than control subjects in the inferior and middle frontal cortex (Malisza et al.
Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to quantify concentrations of NAA, glutamate, and other brain metabolites in globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, and frontal cortex from a well-established cohort of 10 male Mn-exposed smelters and 10 male age-matched control subjects.
These results are supported by recent research that discovered playing computer games lifts a person's mood by balancing the left and right brain activity in the frontal cortex.
The scans looked at the frontal cortex, the part of the human brain associated with impulse control.