frost line


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frost line

[′frȯst ‚līn]
(geology)
The maximum depth of frozen ground during the winter.
The lower limit of the permafrost.
(materials)
In polyethylene film extrusion, a ring-shaped area with a frosty appearance at the point where the film reaches its final diameter.

frost line

An imaginary line indicating the depth of frost penetration in the ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
From digging holes for footings when building decks or sheds, to setting fence corner braces and gates, rural people are not strangers to digging postholes by hand and setting posts below the frost line.
examination of piping buried above the frost line for evidence of deflection at joints during opportunistic excavations for other work, and
After all, the poet is living a new life, one above the frost line with its own slanted view.
Two more ultrasonic sensors are aimed at the bubble above the frost line, where bubble size is stable, to calibrate the lower sensors and ensure the size is kept constant.
A second set of two ultrasonic sensors are aimed at the bubble above the frost line where bubble size is stable to calibrate the lower sensors to ensure the size is kept constant.
If you cannot get the rods deep enough--below the frost line and to the water table--install a cluster of shorter rods.
Northwest breezes keep vines dry and mildew-free, even following a rainy winter, and vineyards are above the frost line, negating the need for frost control.
Within the solar nebula, lies an imaginary temperature line called the frost line.
A winter leachate distribution system was then developed by laying "drip tubing" below the frost line, allowing for year round distribution.
So here's what I'm left with: I can dig another composter that goes well below the three to four foot frost line and hope I can keep it active.
I was told that in order to build a fence in such a cold climate, you needed to go down 3 feet to below the frost line and it was just too costly," Pat Kirkpatrick of Eugene - and a former Wisconsinite - wrote.