freeze

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freeze

1. Meteorol a spell of temperatures below freezing point, usually over a wide area
2. the fixing of incomes, prices, etc., by legislation

freeze

[frēz]
(engineering)
To permit drilling tools, casing, drivepipe, or drill rods to become lodged in a borehole by reason of caving walls or impaction of sand, mud, or drill cuttings, to the extent that they cannot be pulled out. Also known as bind-seize.
To burn in a bit. Also known as burn-in.
The premature setting of cement, especially when cement slurry hardens before it can be ejected fully from pumps or drill rods during a borehole cementation operation.
The act or process of drilling a borehole by utilizing a drill fluid chilled to minus 30-40°F, (minus 34-40°C) as a means of consolidating, by freezing, the borehole wall materials or core as the drill penetrates a water-saturated formation, such as sand or gravel.
(physical chemistry)
To solidify a liquid by removal of heat.

freeze

Terms used in referring to arrivals that have been assigned ACLTs (actual calculated landing time) and to the lists in which they are displayed. See also actual calculated landing time.

freeze

To lock an evolving software distribution or document against changes so it can be released with some hope of stability. Carries the strong implication that the item in question will "unfreeze" at some future date.

There are more specific constructions on this term. A "feature freeze", for example, locks out modifications intended to introduce new features but still allows bugfixes and completion of existing features; a "code freeze" connotes no more changes at all. At Sun Microsystems and elsewhere, one may also hear references to "code slush" - that is, an almost-but-not-quite frozen state.
References in classic literature ?
Moreover, she froze two of her fingers on the way up, she fell in love with her guide on the summit, and she married him when she got to the bottom again.
Then they tucked the old man into a beauti- ful room, which was the spare room, and in the night some time he got powerful thirsty and clumb out on to the porch-roof and slid down a stanchion and traded his new coat for a jug of forty-rod, and clumb back again and had a good old time; and towards daylight he crawled out again, drunk as a fiddler, and rolled off the porch and broke his left arm in two places, and was most froze to death when somebody found him after sun-up.
My wretched feet, flayed and swollen to lameness by the sharp air of January, began to heal and subside under the gentler breathings of April; the nights and mornings no longer by their Canadian temperature froze the very blood in our veins; we could now endure the play-hour passed in the garden: sometimes on a sunny day it began even to be pleasant and genial, and a greenness grew over those brown beds, which, freshening daily, suggested the thought that Hope traversed them at night, and left each morning brighter traces of her steps.
The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice.
And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful if would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.