fucoid

(redirected from fucoids)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

fucoid

[′fyü‚kȯid]
(geology)
A tunnellike marking on a sedimentary structure identified as a trace fossil but not referred to a described genus.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Growth and gonad production of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus in the fucoid bed and algal turf in northern Japan.
Food of the sea urchins Strongylocentrotus nudus and Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus associated with vertical distribution in fucoid beds and crustose coralline fiats in northern Honshu, Japan.
1993, Koch 1993), and the transition from a laminar to a turbulent velocity boundary layer in kelps and fucoids occurs at mainstream velocities of 0.
An unanswered question about the timing of gamete release in fucoids is whether it is a response to environmental variations associated with changing tidal phase, or whether there is an endogenous component to these semilunar rhythms.
We recently demonstrated that high water motion inhibits gamete release in fucoid algae (Serrao et al.
Fucoid algae release male and female gametangia (antheridia and oogonia) through multicellular pores to the surface of the alga from spherical, subepidermal conceptacles present throughout the reproductive tissue (receptacles, Fritsch 1945).
Pelvetia compressa is a monoecious fucoid inhabiting the intertidal zone of Pacific North America.
Fucus vesiculosus is a dioecious fucoid that inhabits the mid-intertidal zone of moderately exposed shores throughout most of its distribution on the American [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 1 OMITTED] and European coasts of the north Atlantic.
Our results suggest that fucoid algae possess a "physiological sensor" of hydrodynamic conditions that is coupled to the control of gamete release, a key event in the life history of organisms with external fertilization.
48 m/s used in our experiments effectively inhibited gamete release in the three species of fucoid algae tested, both under oscillatory flow generated by orbital shaking, or under more constant flow conditions generated by stirring.
This independent source of selective pressure on physiological traits should be particularly important in organisms such as fucoid algae that inhabit stressful environments and lack asexual reproduction.