fulgurite


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fulgurite

[′fu̇l·gə‚rīt]
(geology)
A glassy, rootlike tube formed when a lightning stroke terminates in dry sandy soil; the intense heating of the current passing down into the soil along an irregular path fuses the sand.
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Matthew Pasek and Kristin Block of the University of Arizona, Tucson, used an MRI scanner on 10 fulgurites and found that five contained phosphite.
It is not clear if the fulgurite was formed on the mountain or elsewhere.
In the fulgurite gases, however, carbon dioxide was more than 100 times as common as argon, says Navarro-Gonzalez.
Thus, the first thing one saw on entering the gallery was not the fulgurites themselves but a shelf of "Supplemental Didactics": sixty-six paper booklets, identically bound in drab tan.
So far, the Sheep Mountain fulgurite and the shungite - a coal-like sedimentary material - appear to have very different histories.
10 SCIENCE, is among the first quantitative investigations of the chemical and physical processes behind fulgurite formation.
sand); in formed tubes glass hollow are fulgurites (Lightning L'oeuf); from (tennis 4.
It has been suggested to me that the 'diamond' may be a reference to the geological phenomenon of fulgurites, known in Bislama as tut blotig tancla (Kirk Huffman, pers.
From this discharge of atmospheric electricity, a leader of a bolt of lightning can travel at speeds of 220,000 km/h (140,000 mph), and can reach temperatures approaching 30,000 [degrees]C (54,000 [degrees]F), hot enough to fuse silica sand into glass channels known as fulgurites which are normally hollow and can extend some distance into the ground.
Even before people learned how to make glass, they had discovered two forms of natural glass: fulgurites and obsidian.
2] levels that are 2,500 times higher in 5,000-year-old fulgurites than in modern samples, scientists have speculated that the extra C[O.
Then it hardens into lumps of glass called fulgurites.