full load


Also found in: Acronyms.

full load

[¦fu̇l ′lōd]
(electricity)
The greatest load that a circuit or piece of equipment is designed to carry under specified conditions.
References in periodicals archive ?
6[degrees]C) wide and the plant is 50% loaded, then it could run all day on 50% of full load (which would typically consume as much as 70% of full power).
With insignificant losses under no-load conditions and with 90% of the total losses in the copper wire under full load, the temperature rise at half the load drops to 25% of the temperature rise at full load.
Patented refrigeration technology allows operation from zero to full load.
2], TRS) were low or zero during full load operation of theTse boilers due to high dry solids firing.
The advantages to MRF operators, according to Edelson, is it allows them to save from investing in their own sorting equipment while also being allowed to ship full loads of mixed plastics out faster--rather than waiting for a full load of any one given plastic commodity.
With insignificant losses under no-load conditions and with 90 percent of the total losses in the copper wire under full load, the temperature rise at half the load drops to 25 percent of the temperature rise at full load.
Designed to fit where space is at a premium, the Dexter SWD will wash and dry a full load of clothes in less than one hour.
Before the damage was discovered, the tank had passed a pressure test with a full load of liquid hydrogen, as well as structural load tests simulating the force the X-33 would have with a fully loaded liquid oxygen tank sitting on top of it during a launch.
The blast wheel should be set up to run consistently at full load amps.
The total force developed by the system can be up to 84,400 kp, but only about 40% of this force is needed to eject a full load.
Tenders are invited for Portable Electric Drill Machine 13-23 Mm, Single Phase Ac Supply 50 Hz,240 V, Full Load 600 Watt Approx, No Load Speed 560 Rpm, Full Load 350 Rpm Approx.
Line/load regulation is [+ or -]3% from no load to full load.