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Related to full of: full of life, full of beans

full

1. of, relating to, or designating a relationship established by descent from the same parents
2. Music
a. powerful or rich in volume and sound
b. completing a piece or section; concluding
3. (of sails, etc.) distended by wind
4. (of wine, such as a burgundy) having a heavy body
5. (of a colour) containing a large quantity of pure hue as opposed to white or grey; rich; saturated
6. in full cry (esp of a pack of hounds) in hot pursuit of quarry
7. Brit a ridge of sand or shingle along a seashore

full

Of a dimension, slightly oversize.
References in classic literature ?
I believe it's full of diamonds," he said, in an awed whisper; and, indeed, the idea of a small goat-skin full of diamonds is enough to awe anybody.
The air was full of the perfume of apple bloom, and the bees blundered foolishly and delightfully from one blossom to another, half drunken with perfume.
A curious proof of the subtlety of these Paul Ferroll books in the appeal they made to the imagination is the fact that I came to them fresh from 'Romolo,' and full of horror for myself in Tito; yet I sympathized throughout with Paul Ferroll, and was glad when he got away.
The place was packed as full of smells as a bale is of cotton.
The wood behind seemed full of the stir and murmur of a great company!
Hock is full of fancy, and all wines are by their very nature full of reminiscence, the golden tears and red blood of summers that are gone.
Happy he who, like Ulysses, has made an adventurous voyage; and there is no such sea for adventurous voyages as the Mediterranean - the inland sea which the ancients looked upon as so vast and so full of wonders.
It was Christmas Eve, with its loads a holly and mistletoe, and the town was very full of strangers who had come in from all parts of the country on account of the day.
I am full of gratitude towards you--I am indeed full for all that you have done for me, I am most sensible of your goodness; but, to think that I should be forced to see that, in spite of your own troubles (of which I have been the involuntary cause), you live for me alone--you live but for MY joys and MY sorrows and MY affection
This letter, so full of generous sentiments, disappointed my hopes," Benassis resumed, "so that at first I could think of nothing but my misery; afterwards I welcomed the balm which, in her forgetfulness of self, she had tried to pour into my wounds, but in my first despair I wrote to her somewhat bitterly:
for ye make clean the outside of the cup and of the platter; but within, they are full of extortion and excess.