full-cell process

full-cell process

[¦fu̇l ¦sel ′präs·əs]
(engineering)
A process of preservative treatment of wood that uses a pressure vessel and first draws a vacuum on the charge of wood and then introduces the preservative without breaking the vacuum. Also known as Bethell process.

full-cell process

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This effect would mostly impact leaching and efficacy research studies where small wood samples are treated using a full-cell process with a biocide than can fix to wood, such as the metallics, and subsequently quickly dried.
Creosote and penta products are usually treated by an empty-cell process, while lumber treated with waterborne systems is treated by a full-cell or modified full-cell process.
This study examined the within- and among-sample CCA-C retention variation for small defect-free sapwood SYP field stakes treated together by a full-cell process in a laboratory cylinder.
Each set consisted of 20 boards, with each set treated with CCA-C in one charge by a full-cell or modified full-cell process to a target CCA retention of 0.
Seven sets of kiln-dried SYP 2 by 4's, all 8 feet long, with 20 boards per set, were individually treated with ACQ-D by a full-cell process to a target retention of either 0.
The amount of preservative impregnated into dried wood that is permeable to the treating solution during a full-cell process should be directly correlated to the wood's air void volume, with the air void volume determined by the lumber's SG and MC (Siau 1971).
and were treated by a full-cell process for a lengthy period.