fulminate

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fulminate

(fŭl`mĭnāt), any salt of fulminic acid, HONC, a highly unstable compound known only in solution. The term is most commonly applied to the explosive mercury (II) fulminate, also called fulminate of mercury, Hg(ONC)2. The pure compound forms white cubic crystals. It is made by the action of nitric acid on mercury metal in the presence of alcohol and is often collected as a gray or brown sandy powder. It is very sensitive to heat, shock, or friction and is used in primers, detonators, and blasting caps.

fulminate

[′fu̇l·mə‚nāt]
(medicine)
Of a disease, to come suddenly and follow a severe, intense, and rapid course.
(organic chemistry)
A salt of fulminic acid.
HgC2N2O2 An explosive mercury compound derived from the fulminic acid; used for the caps or exploders by means of which charges of gunpowder, dynamite, and other explosives are fired. Also known as mercury fulminate.

fulminate

any salt or ester of fulminic acid, esp the mercury salt, which is used as a detonator
References in periodicals archive ?
The anti Jewish fulminations of politician and publisher Tom Watson fueled the frenzy that led to Frank's lynching.
Then, too, there are other seasonal stresses peculiar to congregations from which the pulpit fulminations against the pagan perfidy of the outside world provide some relief.
But these allied fulminations represent only the least threatening manifestation of challenge to the American empire.
Despite the fulminations of the accounting directorate, there are signs of the infamous rolling over of budget allocations returning.
And frankly, it is also in America's long-term best interests to be at that table, notwithstanding Jack Valenti's regular fulminations.
His fulminations against consumerism, moreover, are founded on the fact that the "purely economic model" of humanity prevents him from "expressing personhood in an authentic way" (123).
Against the Federalist fulminations, the Jeffersonians articulated the higher law of nature, larding their oratory with references to progress, equality, a new age of revolution and the need to be vigilant against would-be aristocrats bent on reestablishing colonial deference.
His tone is changeable too, encompassing breathtaking poetic precision, as in phrases like "the grid shivers," as well as Lear-like fulminations against imagined opponents.
But in his fulminations against common crime, Castro made it clear he regarded even minor delinquency an assault on the revolution.
Tongues at least may still relish the rolling periods and hearty exhortations, the fulminations and fatal facilities, of doughty old Henley's comrade in arms, Rudyard Kipling.
Adults have to lighten up on warnings and fulminations.