functional

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Related to functional method: functional form

functional

1. Psychol
a. relating to the purpose or context of a behaviour
b. denoting a psychosis such as schizophrenia assumed not to have a direct organic cause, like deterioration or poisoning of the brain
2. Maths a function whose domain is a set of functions and whose range is a set of functions or a set of numbers

Functional

 

a mathematical concept originating in the calculus of variations, where it denotes a variable that depends on one or more functions or curves. Examples of functionals are the area bounded by a closed curve of a given length and the work of a force field along a curve. As functional analysis developed, the term “functional” acquired the more general sense of a numbervalued function defined on a linear space.

functional

[′fəŋk·shən·əl]
(computer science)
In a linear programming problem involving a set of variables xj , j = 1, 2, …, n, a function of the form c1 x1+ c2 x2+ ⋯ + cn xn (where the cj are constants) which one wishes to optimize (maximize or minimize, depending on the problem) subject to a set of restrictions.
(mathematics)
Any function from a vector space into its scalar field.

functional

(1)
Working correctly.

functional

(2)
Pertaining to functional programming.

functional

(3)
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the functional method permits courts to fashion categories without direction from the statutory text, these courts can create conduct-based distinctions that lack significant differences in degree of risk posed and that stifle uniform application.
The debate over whether to use the formal or functional method to divide a statute and employ the modified categorical approach is an example of the familiar distinction between "rules" and "standards.
Because functional-method courts will divide statutes and employ the modified categorical approach more often than formal-method courts, the functional method presents a more significant Apprendi concern than the formal method.
The functional method treads very closely to exactly such a violation.
There is reason to believe, however, that the formal method will be more likely than the functional method to avoid overinclusiveness, consistent with the values embodied in the rule of lenity.
By consulting the additional documents, functional method courts would, given a sufficient record, categorize defendants' past convictions accordingly.
And because it stays hinged to the categorical approach, the formal method is more likely to avoid overinclusiveness than the functional method.
The functional method, however, uses the modified categorical approach to bypass the statute's vagueness, and if it finds that the defendant's prior conviction is a "crime of violence," it resolves the ACCA's vagueness at the defendant's expense.
It is safe to say, though, that the functional method gives judges more discretion to create categories--principled or arbitrary--divide statutes, and utilize the modified categorical approach.
Here, one might respond that the functional method is harsher where appropriate.
Neither the formal nor functional method may provide states any incentive at ali to rewrite their statutes.

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