Funeral

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What does it mean when you dream about a funeral?

People often dream about watching their own funerals. This usually indicates that part of one’s life—or perhaps old ways of seeing things—have died. Alternatively, it can mean that one feels like some aspect of one’s life is dead. Someone else’s funeral in a dream can represent the unconscious desire to see that particular person dead, or a fear that someone might die.

Funeral

Viking funeral
given to Michael Geste by his younger brother, as in their childhood games. [Br. Lit.: P. C. Wren Beau Geste in Benét, 87]

Funeral

(dreams)
Dreaming about funerals does not necessarily symbolize physical death for you or anyone else. It could instead symbolize an ending of a different kind. You may be burying relationships, conditions, or even emotions that you no longer need and that are no longer conducive to your personal growth. On the other hand, this dream may symbolize the burying of sensitivities and emotions that are too difficult to cope with. It may reflect numbness or a feeling that is the opposite of aliveness, such as depression and emptiness. Either way, burying a person that is alive suggests some emotional turmoil. Please consider all of the details in this dream to find the appropriate message. Old dream interpretation books say that dreaming about funerals is a dream of the contrary. Instead of sadness, the dreamer will experience happiness and go to celebrations, such as weddings.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another once-common funerary practice involved burning the dead and placing them in urns.
Cromlechs are circular, small-diameter funerary structures that enclose a deposit of incinerated human remains in the centre.
Doing so will lead to the recognition that funerary arts create an experience that cannot be overlooked, an experience that ensures the connection between the material and the spiritual realms.
The trio heads towards what they assume to be the most promising matanga, since a wealthy family is organizing its funerary wake on the open terrain of the Fikin (mainly known for its funfairs and business fairs).
In a statement, Bokova said that these acts show the barbaric and ignorant nature of extremist groups, and that the sight of funerary statues being destroyed in a public square before a crowd that contains children witnessing the destruction of their heritage is a disturbing site.
Erik Davis's contribution, "Weaving life out of death: the craft of the rag robe in Cambodian funerary ritual," then proceeds to examine the theme of the pamsukula (both a cloth offering and a sub-ritual of the funerary sequence) in its wider ramifications in Khmer funeral culture.
These questions are at the heart of Suzanne Glover Lindsay's Funerary Arts and Tomb Cult.
These consist of a remarkable illuminated funerary manuscript in a private collection, and related texts from other sources including the Gathang Bumpa and Dunhuang collections.
In the introduction Ladwig and Williams make several important general points: 1) the study of death and funerary cultures is largely not about the dead, but about the relationships among the living and the living-dead (ghosts and/or spirits of deceased ancestors): 2) the dead are still agents in rituals, narratives, and family lives; 3) death is also about birth and transition; 4) despite Buddhist emphasis on the concept of nonself/non-soul, there are many local concepts of soul-like things (phi, kwan, chi) in Southeast Asia and China.
In scholarly but clear language, Lindsay takes readers through the ways the funerary arts shaped and reflected the hopes and realities of French people in an era of violent change, both before and after the Revolution.
There is a stirring in the coffin business that is throwing the lid open on challenges facing the funerary industry.
Hundreds reportedly took part in the funerary cortege amid anti-Syrian chanting at the Sheikh Ziad cemetery.