Funeral

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What does it mean when you dream about a funeral?

People often dream about watching their own funerals. This usually indicates that part of one’s life—or perhaps old ways of seeing things—have died. Alternatively, it can mean that one feels like some aspect of one’s life is dead. Someone else’s funeral in a dream can represent the unconscious desire to see that particular person dead, or a fear that someone might die.

Funeral

Viking funeral
given to Michael Geste by his younger brother, as in their childhood games. [Br. Lit.: P. C. Wren Beau Geste in Benét, 87]

Funeral

(dreams)
Dreaming about funerals does not necessarily symbolize physical death for you or anyone else. It could instead symbolize an ending of a different kind. You may be burying relationships, conditions, or even emotions that you no longer need and that are no longer conducive to your personal growth. On the other hand, this dream may symbolize the burying of sensitivities and emotions that are too difficult to cope with. It may reflect numbness or a feeling that is the opposite of aliveness, such as depression and emptiness. Either way, burying a person that is alive suggests some emotional turmoil. Please consider all of the details in this dream to find the appropriate message. Old dream interpretation books say that dreaming about funerals is a dream of the contrary. Instead of sadness, the dreamer will experience happiness and go to celebrations, such as weddings.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a statement, Bokova said that these acts show the barbaric and ignorant nature of extremist groups, and that the sight of funerary statues being destroyed in a public square before a crowd that contains children witnessing the destruction of their heritage is a disturbing site.
It will also fund the documentation, presentation and promotion of the funerary collection, which will in turn allow for the recruitment of young Lebanese professionals in the field.
Erik Davis's contribution, "Weaving life out of death: the craft of the rag robe in Cambodian funerary ritual," then proceeds to examine the theme of the pamsukula (both a cloth offering and a sub-ritual of the funerary sequence) in its wider ramifications in Khmer funeral culture.
In the introduction Ladwig and Williams make several important general points: 1) the study of death and funerary cultures is largely not about the dead, but about the relationships among the living and the living-dead (ghosts and/or spirits of deceased ancestors): 2) the dead are still agents in rituals, narratives, and family lives; 3) death is also about birth and transition; 4) despite Buddhist emphasis on the concept of nonself/non-soul, there are many local concepts of soul-like things (phi, kwan, chi) in Southeast Asia and China.
The discovery also denotes that the funerary temple of Amenhotep III was filled with a great number of gods' statues as were also found in the king's temple in the eastern mainland of Luxor, which is known as the temple of the goddess Mut.
In scholarly but clear language, Lindsay takes readers through the ways the funerary arts shaped and reflected the hopes and realities of French people in an era of violent change, both before and after the Revolution.
For that reason, the Poarch Band repeatedly endeavored, for more than six years after the archeological discovery, to reach a harmonious resolution with the Muscogee Nation to address both sides' interests in the proper reinterment of the remains and funerary objects found there.
Now, members of the funerary services industry are calling for the break up of this monopoly on coffins and privatizing the entire funerary industry, where most of the complex process is currently handled by the government.
Hundreds reportedly took part in the funerary cortege amid anti-Syrian chanting at the Sheikh Ziad cemetery.
The chapter stresses the importance of Kaharingan for the ethnocultural identity of the modern Ngaju and the role of the tiwah funerary festival as a "cultural production and representation" (p.
A series of funerary jars speaks to such a relationship.
We focus, in particular, on the changing role and significance of horses in Bronze Age mortuary rites, drawing on evidence from new analyses of faunal assemblages from funerary and domestic contexts, and lipid residue analyses of ceramics deposited both on settlements and in graves.