fungus

(redirected from fungal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to fungal: Fungal growth, fungal diseases

fungus

1. any member of a kingdom of organisms (Fungi) that lack chlorophyll, leaves, true stems, and roots, reproduce by spores, and live as saprotrophs or parasites. The group includes moulds, mildews, rusts, yeasts, and mushrooms
2. Pathol any soft tumorous growth
www.agarics.org/Index.jsp
www.fungaljungal.org
www.botanical.com
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fungi/fungi.html
www.elib.cs.berkeley.edu/photos/fungi

Fungus

Molds, mildews, yeasts, mushrooms and puffballs; a group of organisms that are lacking in chlorophyll and usually nonmobile, filamentous, and multicellular. Some grow in soil; others attach themselves to decaying trees and other plants to obtain nutrients. Some are pathogens; others stabilize sewage and digest composted waste.

fungus

[′fəŋ·gəs]
(mycology)
Singular of fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
R oryzae), but a lack of fungal growth does not exclude the disease.
Another common fungal pathogen, Aspergillis, has been found to respond to rM-CSF therapy.
The lineages of the lichen she identified in central Florida patches differ sharply--in both fungal and algal partners--from Eglin's lichen.
The medical need for rapid diagnosis of respiratory fungal infections has never been so strong.
Periodic acid-Schiff(PAS) staining revealed the presence of a mycelium on an inflammatory background that was made up of septate hyphae; no other diagnostic fungal structures were noted (figure 2,A).
Acquiring commercialization rights to the fungal biofilm research of Dr.
However, some of the fungal efflux-pump inhibitors do inhibit a mammalian pump.
Systemic treatments enter into the general bloodstream and cause drug interactions as well as disturbance of the fungal ecology.
However, an evidently larger fungal load was noted intraductally rather than within the parenchyma of the parotid gland itself.
It is specific to fungal cells and present in many fungal pathogens, including one of the most dangerous human pathogens, Candida albicans.
The fungal evidence for plant death squares with recent work by Gregory J.
ABIP holds the promise of preventing fatal fungal infections that start in the lungs, can be very difficult to treat, and are associated with extremely high mortality rates in spite of currently available treatments.