fungible

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fungible

[′fən·jə·bəl]
(chemical engineering)
Pertaining to petroleum products whose characteristics are so similar they can be commingled.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fungibility strategy has also been used for decades by state policymakers, who have often been the ones to design and test new approaches to restrict the use of family planning funds.
The implications of foreign aid fungibility for development assistance: Policy Research Working Paper 2022.
Aid fungibility is not as big a concern as is sometimes thought.
The man behind, despite not owning the domain of duress or error, would hold the domain of the fact through the domain of the will, since the success of the criminal plan would be provided by the executor fungibility.
Thirdly, the importance of classification lies in the consequences of the proportion between the fungibility and the consumption.
In its interactive ratings of takaful companies, Standard & Poor s is of the opinion that there is real fungibility from shareholder funds (and the attaching assets) to the takaful fund if the latter is in deficit (unless demonstrated otherwise).
The theory of capability delivery based on the notion of fungibility of capabilities and "solution agnosticism" is unsupported by either academic investigation or practical utility.
The basic logic of good economic design is fungibility and transparency," Victor notes ruefully.
We found two important moderators of the link between situational uncertainty and formation of new capabilities, namely, resource fungibility and shared experiences of managers.
But when it comes to the acknowledged aim of poverty reduction, based on macro and micro policy changes, given the well-known fungibility of resources, the country realistically has to be viewed as the only really viable "project.
The fungibility of aid is that, briefly, if the government spending pattern and the objectives of the donors are not coordinated in terms of actual destination of aid that leads to the meaning of fungbility of aid (McGillvray and Morrissey, 2000).
Over time, Wood believes that competition will drive down costs, however for the moment he says, "If you want fungibility between CCPs the costs are a cross that has to be borne.