furnace black

furnace black

[′fər·nəs ‚blak]
(chemistry)
A carbon black formed by partial combustion of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons in a closed furnace with a deficiency of oxygen; used as a reinforcing filler for synthetic rubber.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furnace black segment estimated to lead overall carbon black market
Through system diagrams, the brochure reviews the three ways that carbon black particles for tinting applications are manufactured: the Furnace Black Process, the Degussa Gas Black Process and the Lamp Black Process.
The materials natural rubber (RSS-1) and carbon blacks (N330 N550 and N660) provided by Rainbow rubber industry Karachi (CBN330 high- abrasion furnace black average primary particle diameter 30 nm CBN550 fast-extruding furnace black average primary particle diameter 50 nm and CBN660 general purpose furnace black with 65 nm average primary particle diameter) have been cross linked by sulfur vulcanization.
The furnace black casing is aluminum alloy and anti-scratch material gives it a perfect texture.
The mix consists of nitrocellulose, polyurethane, ethanol, N-propanol, ethyl acetate, glycol ether and 14% of either a medium color channel or oxidized furnace black.
Phoenix Black E900 is said to have the low level modulus of N990 coupled with the tensile strength of a furnace black.
31, in an effort to better utilize its furnace black capacity in North America.
Furnace black accounts for 80% of the total volume.
Note that the graphitic layers become more ordered or graphitic in going from the "as-produced" furnace black to the high performance carbon, which improves the electrical and thermal conductivity of the high performance carbon versus the as-produced furnace black.
Thus, a highly filled thermal black compound is portraying similar resilient behavior to a compound which is less loaded, containing a more reinforcing furnace black.
Figure 1 shows two carbon black production processes used, the furnace black process and the lamp black process.
For each furnace black, the lowest energy of 15 kJ/mol corresponds to the most abundant energy sites located on graphitic layers.