furnaces


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furnaces

Used to heat air only. These devices operate efficiently and can use a wide range of energy resources, such as natural gas, propane, biomass, fossil oil, or electricity. See also: Heating/cooling systems
References in classic literature ?
He was taken to the Bessemer furnace, where they made billets of steel--a domelike building, the size of a big theater.
Finally I won, and was permitted to go to the school in the day for a few months, with the understanding that I was to rise early in the morning and work in the furnace till nine o'clock, and return immediately after school closed in the afternoon for at least two more hours of work.
We shall do it," replied the Scarecrow, "although it requires a lot of courage for me to go near to the furnaces of the Nome King.
The boy held the tiller, while against the red glare of the furnace I could see old Smith, stripped to the waist, and shovelling coals for dear life.
In that time the engineer can light the furnaces, and we shall be ready to start as soon as you have finished.
Hence the mines have an aspect singularly quiet, as compared to those in England: here no smoke, furnaces, or great steam-engines, disturb the solitude of the surrounding mountains.
There are fifty-seven apple-evaporating furnaces, to say nothing of the apple canneries and cider and vinegar factories.
Coketown did not come out of its own furnaces, in all respects like gold that had stood the fire.
Through the growing gloom there pulsed the red glow of the furnaces on the sides of the hills.
But good society, floated on gossamer wings of light irony, is of very expensive production; requiring nothing less than a wide and arduous national life condensed in unfragrant deafening factories, cramping itself in mines, sweating at furnaces, grinding, hammering, weaving under more or less oppression of carbonic acid, or else, spread over sheepwalks, and scattered in lonely houses and huts on the clayey or chalky corn-lands, where the rainy days look dreary.
In a large and lofty building, supported by pillars of iron, with great black apertures in the upper walls, open to the external air; echoing to the roof with the beating of hammers and roar of furnaces, mingled with the hissing of red-hot metal plunged in water, and a hundred strange unearthly noises never heard elsewhere; in this gloomy place, moving like demons among the flame and smoke, dimly and fitfully seen, flushed and tormented by the burning fires, and wielding great weapons, a faulty blow from any one of which must have crushed some workman's skull, a number of men laboured like giants.
This cave was made with a clothes horse for a roof, bureaus for walls, and in it was a small furnace in full blast, with a black pot on it and an old witch bending over it.