gyrus

(redirected from fusiform gyrus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to fusiform gyrus: amygdala, lingual gyrus

gyrus

[′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
One of the convolutions (ridges) on the surface of the cerebrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key to the research was imaging-analysis technology that allowed the scientists to look at patterns of activity across the fusiform gyrus.
In contras-t, adults showed selective activation in the unimodal region of the auditory association area (AA) when processing spoken word forms and selective activation in the unimodal visual areas of fusiform gyrus (FG) when processing written word forms.
Conscious consideration of a word's spelling or pronunciation may rev up the left fusiform gyrus.
These participants display elevated fusiform gyrus activity as they identify pairs of matching greebles.
Although the medial fusiform gyrus responded most strongly to images of houses, chairs also prompted appreciable activity in this region.
The fusiform gyrus is part of the associative visual cortex and is in a feedback loop with the amygdala, said Dr.
These two sections of the fusiform gyrus take part in a portion of the brain's visual system that specializes in word recognition, Nobre's team theorizes.
By doing this, the brain imaging showed that new nouns primarily activate the left fusiform gyrus (the underside of the temporal lobe associated with visual and object processing), while the new verbs activated part of the left posterior medial temporal gyrus (associated with semantic and conceptual aspects) and the left inferior frontal gyrus (involved in processing grammar).
It has long been known that an area in the right lateral fusiform gyrus becomes preferentially activated during facial recognition tasks in normal individuals.
Using brain imaging, researchers showed that the speech motor areas of the brain (inferior frontal gyrus) were active at the same time (after a seventh of a second) as the orthographic word-form was being resolved within a brain region called the fusiform gyrus.
The researchers concluded that the brain regions that are active during facial recognition may represent part of a distributed neural system for face processing in chimpanzees, like that proposed in humans, in which the initial visual analysis of faces activates regions in the occipital and temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex (a portion of the brain involved in memory, attention, and perceptual awareness) followed by additional processing in the fusiform gyrus and other regions.
Cibu Thomas, a neuroscientist who led the study while at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, said that people who develop the condition later in life are usually those who have suffered a stroke or an injury in a brain region important for facial recognition, called the fusiform gyrus.