gyrus

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Related to fusiform gyrus: amygdala, lingual gyrus

gyrus

[′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
One of the convolutions (ridges) on the surface of the cerebrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activations in regions such as parahippocampal, frontal, and fusiform gyrus are according to the findings reported in paradigms of face emotional processing and recognition in passive view [10], shifting of the attentional focus [11], and implicit emotional tasks [12].
1997) Face-specific processing in the human fusiform gyrus.
Increased activity related to seeing infant faces was also found in the fusiform gyrus, on each side of the brain near the ears, a brain area linked to facial recognition.
The scans revealed that when a woman observes the face of other people, it shows up in activity in the fusiform gyrus (NOTE: SPELLING IS CORRECT) of the right brain.
FACIAL RECOGNITION From four months old, babies start to use a part of their brain called the fusiform gyrus which allows them to tell the difference between strangers and carers.
The second, the right fusiform gyrus (RFG), forced the face into a known or unknown category.
The ventral projection includes the unimodal visual area of the fusiform gyrus (FG), which may contain orthographic representations of words (Fujimaki et al.
Current face perception theories suggest neurons in a portion of the brain called the fusiform gyrus light up in response to a face, leading researchers to refer to this region as the "fusiform face area.
Results: Compared with the preoperation counterparts, the PA patients with improved vision after the operation exhibited reduced ReHo in the bilateral thalamus, globus pallidus, caudate nucleus, putamen nucleus, supplementary motor area, and left hippocampal formation, and increased ReHo in the bilateral cuneus gyrus, calcarine gyrus, right lingual gyrus, and fusiform gyrus.
46] Using the facial recognition task, which evaluates social cognitive function, individuals with schizophrenia exhibited deactivation of the bilateral fusiform gyrus, occipital gyrus, cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus and cerebellum, left superior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobe and the thalamus, and the right inferior parietal lobe.
Functional MRI showed improved blood flow in three brain regions involved with encoding and memorization of nonverbal associations: the right lingual gyrus, the occipital fusiform gyrus, and the right frontal pole.