fusion zone

fusion zone

[′fyü·zhən ‚zōn]
(metallurgy)
The volume of base or parent metal melted during a welding operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 71-year-old Chicagoan Jack DeJohnette is one of jazz music's master sticksmen, notable as a Miles Davis sideman, just as the trumpeter was entering his fusion zone at the close of the 1960s.
7, revealed a greater presence of grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and acicular ferrite (AF) at the fusion zone in (b), (c) and (d).
Due to the thermoplastic behaviour of the TPC components, the fusion zone can be weakened by temperature.
If the specimen breaks outside the weld and fusion zone (that is, in the parent pipe material) and meets the minimum tensile-strength requirements of the specification, the weld shall be accepted as meeting the requirements.
The angle of the wedge is optimised to reduce the electronic steering with the probe elements while still covering the weld fusion zone.
During this cooling, the material contracts, creating tensile stresses in the fusion zone.
On the other hand a high travel speed of hybrid welding processes lead to a fast heating and cooling cycle in the workpiece, and so many metallurgical defects could appear in weld fusion zone.
The heating and cooling rate of the metal in the vicinity of the fusion zone was low and the holding time and high temperature considerably longer.
The result of this is a small heat-affected zone (HAZ), which cools very rapidly with very little distortion, and a high depth-to-width ratio for the fusion zone [11].
When welded, ductile iron is liquefied in the welded area and may solidify with a carbidic structure in the fusion zone that limits the toughness of the weldment.
The acknowledged mechanism of creep in seam welds is the development of cavities (cavitation) around nonmetallic inclusions and carbides on the grain boundaries in the fine-grained heat affected zone (HAZ) or fusion zone of the seam weld (Fig.