fustian


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Related to fustian: habergeon

fustian

a. a hard-wearing fabric of cotton mixed with flax or wool with a slight nap
b. (as modifier): a fustian jacket
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fustian was imported into Britain as far back as the 16th century and is mentioned in Charles Dickens' The Pickwick Papers and Thomas Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge, suggesting it was by then an everyday clothing fabric.
Dryden in Oedipus, and what Applause is given to the Rants and Fustian of Mr.
Vocabulary and grammar are allowed to be as fantastic as the action that they describe, and are suffered to alternate in the wildest swings from grand to low style, from fustian to textbook simplicity, from the recherche to the banal.
Mutual obligation as social virtue--vis-a-vis the horse and the livery stable--in this case trumps those virtues of gentlemanly behavior espoused by the comparatively fustian message of the Boss.
Of these the most important were textiles: damask, fustian, muslin, organdie, atlas, satin and taffeta.
And don't be surprised to discover that, contacting new donors, no envelope copy might bring better results than all the fustian, bombast, and obviously phony stroking we see on our competitors' envelopes.
Certainly he made a life study of man; he tracked every emotion and mood and thought and passion of man to its secret lair in the human heart, dragged it out, incarnated it in man or woman, king, peasant, soldier, student, lover, clown, clothed it in ermine or fustian or in mourner's weeds, and made it "strut and fret its hour upon the stage.
prime example of fustian babble, whereas I see it as both metaphorical
Thanks to Sieburth's edition, we can witness for ourselves how the great poems began to emerge from the sumps of fustian and rant.
71) Tyrrell suggests in "Class-Consciousness" that Smiles had abandoned his political Radicalism by 1859: "Thus," says Tyrrell, "whereas in 1845 Smiles had praised the dignity of the laborer as 'higher by far than that of the titled idler; and the grimed fustian of the one more honourable and enobling [sic] than the glittering star and garter of the other,' by 1859 the 'titled idlers' had become representatives of families which had worked their way to success, being recruited to a great extent 'from the ranks of honourable industry,'" 124.
A YOUR letter brought to mind my favourite line in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales about the knight's appearance: "Of fustian he wered a gypoun, al bismotered with his habergeoun.