Gabion

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gabion

[′gā·bē·ən]
(engineering)
A bottomless basket of wickerwork or metal iron filled with earth or stones; used in building fieldworks or as revetments in mining. Also known as pannier.

Gabion

 

a structure in the form of a box made of a galvanized metallic net filled with stone or pebbles on a frame. A gabion is used to protect against the scouring of riverbeds and to construct regulating installations for the protection of shorelines. A gabion usually is in the form of a parallelepiped with the following dimensions: length, 3-5 m; width, 1-1.5 m; and height, 1 m. To prevent destruction, the riverbed at an installation is paved with gabion mattresses. The gabion is employed for riverbeds where current velocity is between 1.5 and 3 m per sec.

REFERENCE

Grishin, M. M. Gidrotekhnicheskie sooruzheniia. Moscow, 1968.

Gabion

 

a cylindrical wickerwork basket, made of twigs or brushwood and filled with earth, used since ancient times as protection against fired projectiles; specifically, it was used to build revetments for field fortifications and various shelters on loose ground. Gabions were from 0.8 to 1.3 m high and up to 1 m in diameter. When required, as in the building of high embankments, gabions were arranged in several rows, one over another. With the increasing use of rifled bores in artillery in the latter half of the 19th century, gabions lost their usefulness.

gabion

A cylindrical wicker or metal basket that is filled with stones; used in the construction of foundations.