gadoid

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gadoid

of, relating to, or belonging to the Anacanthini, an order of marine soft-finned fishes typically having the pectoral and pelvic fins close together and small cycloid scales. The group includes gadid fishes and hake
References in periodicals archive ?
About 2000 troops took part in the evacuation of Gadid, where a few hold-out families, along with about 60 extremist "reinforcements", remained.
The lone mission to Gadid followed day-long clashes at two centres of hardcore resistance - synagogues at Neve Dekalim and Kfar Darom.
The scene in Gadid was a sharp contrast to the fierce stand-offs on Thursday between troops and young protesters in the Neve Dekalim and Kfar Darom settlements.
The troops pushed through a barricade of flaming cars and entered the settlement of Gadid at sunrise yesterday, a day after youths holed up on a synagogue rooftop pelted soldiers with acid, oil and sand in the most violent protest against Israel's Gaza pullout.
Conversely, the ratio of cod family to other fishes is included to detect any shift in prey selection towards the gadid species known to have been of paramount importance in Iron Age, Viking Age and medieval Norway (Enghoff 1999:55; Perdikaris 1999).
The 22 discussed cases include investment activities in the trade, petroleum, agriculture and irrigation ministries as well as disputes between investors and the governorates of Cairo, Giza, Red Sea, South Sinai and Wadi Gadid.
Seven Islamist parties, Al-Rayah, Al-Islah, Al-mal Al Gadid, Al-Asalah, Al-Fadilah, Al-Shb and Al-Islami announced in a conference on Saturday their new coalition under the name "Al-Ummah Alliance".
Of these 10 taxa, 3 prey groups (unidentified gadid, skate species, and American Shad [Alosa sapidissima]) could not be used because we had insufficient methods (e.
Moreover, samples of modern and ancient muscle and bone from gadid fish, the most important marine food in Norse Scotland (Barrett et al.
1), is a commercially important groundfish species of the gadid family that is distributed throughout the northwest Atlantic from Greenland to Cape Hatteras (Bigelow and Schroeder, 1953).
Some experimental evidence suggests this element is relatively fragile in gadid taxa other than haddock (Barrett 1992; Jones 1991; Nicholson 1991; 1992b).
This gadid diet has been hypothesized to result in chronic nutritional stress and ultimately population declines (Trites and Donnelly, 2003, Trites et al.