gaff


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gaff

1. Angling a stiff pole with a stout prong or hook attached for landing large fish
2. Nautical a boom hoisted aft of a mast to support a gaffsail
3. a metal spur fixed to the leg of a gamecock
References in periodicals archive ?
Gaff, who received a 50-1 quote for the Derby from Cashmans, is owned by Dallas-based Ludolph Heiligbrodt, who also has dual winner Man O World and unraced Merger in training with Weld.
And both he and runner-up Gaff, which finished seven lengths clear of the third, should prove more effective on better ground.
Trainer Weld described Gaff as "potentially very good" after his victory over Zelkova at Fairyhouse, only his second outing, having made his debut at Keeneland back in April.
A nearby angler offered a handmade gaff, but Wright wanted to try the net one more time.
Latest accounts show he got pounds 879,000 just to cover the cost of moving from his mansion in California to a swanky new gaff in Surrey.
SIR ALEX FERGUSON was on course to see Fairgame Man, in whom he owns a share, contest the six-furlong handicap, but the Alan Berry-trained sprinter failed to figure after a tardy start in a race won in thrilling style by Chispa, whose own joint-owner, William Gaff, purposely chose to stay away.
Yes, it takes time getting a big fish out of a net, but that's better than seeing it lost at the gaff after a long fight.
But I really liked this one when I saw her at the sales, sold her on to my friend William Gaff, and we're both delighted.
Halibut usually come up in horizontal fashion, but this one breached the surface headfirst, making it difficult to gaff the specimen's slender profile.
Joe took the rig again and I prepared to gaff whatever I was to gaff.
Her emphatic victory in the nursery was witnessed by owners William Gaff and Tammy Hickford, who had flown over from Ireland to cheer her on.
At other times, they all seem interchangeable with names like Fife, Gaff, Bell, Tall, Witt.