gain

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gain

Electronics the ratio of the output signal of an amplifier to the input signal, usually measured in decibels

gain

1. A measure of the amplification of an electronic device. If the power input to the device is P 1 and the power output is P 2, the gain expressed in decibels is given by
G = 10 log10 (P 2 /P 1 )

Gains measured in this way can be added when amplifying stages are connected in series.

2. A measure of the directional advantage of using one radio antenna as compared with another. It is usual to express the gain, G , of a particular antenna over an isotropic radiator. For a lossless antenna it is given by
G = 4πA e2
where A e is the effective area (see array) and λ is the wavelength; the gain is equal to the directivity in this case. Sometimes the comparison is with a dipole, which itself has a gain over an isotropic radiator of 1.5 (equivalent to 1.7 decibels, or dBi).

gain

[gān]
(electronics)
The increase in signal power that is produced by an amplifier; usually given as the ratio of output to input voltage, current, or power, expressed in decibels. Also known as transmission gain.
(electromagnetism)
(engineering)
A cavity in a piece of wood prepared by notching or mortising so that a hinge or other hardware or another piece of wood can be placed on the cavity.

Gain

An increase in signal power or voltage produced by an amplifier in transmitting a signal from one point to another. The amount of gain is usually expressed in decibels above a reference level. See Amplifier

Antenna gain is a measure of the effectiveness of a directional antenna as compared to a nondirectional antenna. See Antenna (electromagnetism)

gain

gain joint
In carpentry, a groove or notch in one piece into which another piece is fitted.

gain

i. The amplification obtained in a radio circuit or a component of the circuit. It is measured as a direct ratio or logarithmically. In radar, there are two general usages of the term: (a) antenna gain, or a gain factor, is the ratio of the power transmitted along the beam axis to that of an isotropic radiator transmitting the same total power; and (b) receiver gain, or video gain, measures how much a receiver amplifies an incoming signal.
ii. A general term for the increase in signal power after transmission from one point to another. Gain is usually expressed in decibels and is widely used to denote transducer gain.

gain

The amount of increase that an amplifier provides on the output side of the circuit.
References in periodicals archive ?
He stressed that "al-Maliki and his militia are trying to gain time in malicious ways, including the formation of committees to negotiate with the protesters in a blatant plane to buy such a traitors who will be used as a mean to suppress the protesters sooner.
The postponement has been made at the request of the regime that seeks to gain time in an attempt to mislead the mediators," he told AFP.
Paul Schaefer, managing member of the corporations, said he filed for Chapter 11 reorganization to gain time with his creditors, as he tries to cope with higher fuel costs and tenants slow to pay their rent.
According to the company, Celsius' database of over 450 handsets enables developers to gain time and reduce cost of making Java mobile games available across multiple mobile devices.
He said: "It's going to be difficult to gain time, even now - we'll have to see.
It's going to be difficult to gain time, even now - we'll have to see in the next couple of days,' he told Eurosport.
Mr Brill said he suspected the freeze was an attempt by Iran to gain time and hide covert activities before allowing agency inspectors access to new sites.
We suppose that he is trying to gain time, maybe negotiating with other clubs, but I don't know which clubs would be pay the 12 million euros he has been on here.
The United States should be invited to cooperate with the Allies, partly to gain time, partly "in order to attach the United States to the general system of Europe and to prevent a spirit of rivalry and hatred establishing it self between the Old and the New World.
When the board tried to gain time to get its hands around the issues, doctors perceived the board as uninformed by the CEO.
tactic of using diplomacy to gain time before launching military operations.
Yet could it be that under our modernist desire to gain time and fill every moment of our lives survives an innate desire to stretch further the perceived short limits of our own existence?