gale


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gale

a strong wind, specifically one of force seven to ten on the Beaufort scale or from 45 to 90 kilometres per hour

gale

[gāl]
(meteorology)
An unusually strong wind.
In storm-warning terminology, a wind of 28-47 knots (52-87 kilometers per hour).
In the Beaufort wind scale, a wind whose speed is 28-55 knots (52-102 kilometers per hour).

gale

Persistent strong winds with a mean speed exceeding 30 knots or gusts of 43 to 51 knots. Its value is 8 on Beufort's scale. Gales are normally associated with strong pressure gradients, depressions, and storms. See also Beufort's scale.
References in classic literature ?
There is a roar, a thunder of feet, a flashing of spears, a bending of plumes, and, like a river that has burnt its banks, like storm-clouds before the gale, we sweep down upon friend and foe.
Who would have thought that upon the proud day when this battle was won, the very gale which waved the Saxon banners in triumph, was filling the Norman sails, and impelling them to the fatal shores of Sussex?
We have been watching the storm, and there is some one knocking at the--" A tremendous battery with the knocker, followed by a sound, confused by the gale, as of a man shouting, interrupted her.
We then set sail, and had a good voyage till we passed the Straits of Madagascar; but having got northward of that island, and to about five degrees south latitude, the winds, which in those seas are observed to blow a constant equal gale between the north and west, from the beginning of December to the beginning of May, on the 19th of April began to blow with much greater violence, and more westerly than usual, continuing so for twenty days together: during which time, we were driven a little to the east of the Molucca Islands, and about three degrees northward of the line, as our captain found by an observation he took the 2nd of May, at which time the wind ceased, and it was a perfect calm, whereat I was not a little rejoiced.
Yet as he pulled out against the gale he could see that even there had once been a seal nursery.
The wind, obstinately remaining in the north-west, blew a gale, and retarded the steamer.
The gale through the moaning trees Fitfully rushes.
Hunt was on shore, with some others of the crew, there arose a terrible gale.
No; Burnt House is under High Pardons Wood, before you come to Gale Anstey," Sophie corrected.
For nine months of the year there is only ice and snow, and gale after gale, with a cold that no one can realise who has never seen the thermometer even at zero.
that we should take advantage of the strong gale which bore us on, and in place of beating back to Paris, make an attempt to reach the coast of North America.
Tis said that when The hands of men Tamed this primeval wood, And hoary trees with groans of woe, Like warriors by an unknown foe, Were in their strength subdued, The virgin Earth Gave instant birth To springs that ne'er did flow That in the sun Did rivulets run, And all around rare flowers did blow The wild rose pale Perfumed the gale And the queenly lily adown the dale(Whom the sun and the dew And the winds did woo), With the gourd and the grape luxuriant grew.