Gallery

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gallery

1. a room or building for exhibiting works of art
2. a covered passageway open on one side or on both sides
3. 
a. a balcony running along or around the inside wall of a church, hall, etc.
b. a covered balcony, sometimes with columns on the outside
4. Theatre
a. an upper floor that projects from the rear over the main floor and contains the cheapest seats
b. the seats there
c. the audience seated there
5. a long narrow room, esp one used for a specific purpose
6. Chiefly US a building or room where articles are sold at auction
7. Theatre a narrow raised platform at the side or along the back of the stage for the use of technicians and stagehands
8. Nautical a balcony or platform at the quarter or stern of a ship, sometimes used as a gun emplacement

Gallery

A long covered area acting as a corridor inside or on the exterior of a building or between buildings. A room, often top-lit, used for the display of artwork.

Gallery

 

(1) A long, covered, well-lit space where usually one of the long walls is replaced by columns or posts and sometimes also by a balustrade. In the first half of the 16th century, especially during the baroque period, a new type of gallery was developed in European palace architecture: a spacious hall with a succession of large windows on one long wall. Beginning in the 17th century, such galleries contained the art collections of the palace owners. Later, art museums as well as their departments came to be called galleries. In modern architecture the gallery is an important functional element of gallery houses.

(2) An upper tier of a theater.

(3) Figuratively in Russian, a long row, a file (for instance, a galley of set type in Russian is called a galereia).


Gallery

 

(Russian, shtrek), a horizontal, underground mine passage that has no exit on the surface and that usually follows the vein or rock in which it is excavated, in which case it may be called a drift or rock drift. Various types of galleries are distinguished according to purpose, including primary (main roads), panel, horizontal, excavation, intermediate, transport, and ventilation galleries.

gallery

[′gal·rē]
(geology)
A horizontal, or nearly horizontal, underground passage.
A subsidiary passage in a cave at a higher level than the main passage.
(mining engineering)

gallery

gallery, 1
1. A long, covered area acting as a corridor inside or on the exterior of a building, or between buildings.
2. An elevated area, interior or exterior, e.g., minstrel gallery, music gallery, roof gallery.
3. An elevated section of the seating area of an auditorium, esp. the uppermost such space.
4. In buildings for public worship, a similar space, sometimes set apart for special uses.
5. A service passageway within a building, or linking a building underground to exterior supplies or exits. Some service galleries also serve sightseers, e.g., the lighting gallery in the base of the dome at St. Peter’s, Rome.
6. A long, narrow room for special activities like target practice, etc.
7. A room, often top-lit, used for the display of art works.
8. A building serving such art needs.
10. Any raised working platform at the side or rear of a theater stagehouse.
11. An arcade, 2.
12. (Brit.) A device, attached to a lampholder, for supporting a reflector, shade, etc.
References in classic literature ?
The galleries that surrounded the court were festooned with a curtain of some kind of Moorish stuff, and could be drawn down at pleasure, to exclude the beams of the sun.
Gradually the galleries became filled with knights and nobles, in their robes of peace, whose long and rich-tinted mantles were contrasted with the gayer and more splendid habits of the ladies, who, in a greater proportion than even the men themselves, thronged to witness a sport, which one would have thought too bloody and dangerous to afford their sex much pleasure.
At length the duke came out to take her down, and as they entered a spacious court two fair damsels came forward and threw over Don Quixote's shoulders a large mantle of the finest scarlet cloth, and at the same instant all the galleries of the court were lined with the men-servants and women-servants of the household, crying, "Welcome, flower and cream of knight-errantry
While awaiting the official announcement of dinner, the company were sauntering on the terrace above the river, and gazing at the water-plants, the mosaic of the currents, and the various pretty details of the houses clustering across the river, their old wooden galleries, their mouldering window- frames, their little gardens where clothes were drying, the cabinet- maker's shop,--in short, the many details of a small community to which the vicinity of a river, a weeping willow, flowers, rose-bushes, added a certain grace, making the scene quite worthy of a landscape painter.
There was no stairway, but a gentle incline to the first floor of the building opened into an enormous chamber encircled by galleries.
To right and left ran long, dark galleries, where sight was lost.
I used all my influence with one of the committee, a young peer of my acquaintance, to get admission to one of the galleries.
And Violet said, Yes; so day after day they labored to make a pathway through the frozen earth, that she might reach the roots of the withered flowers; and soon, wherever through the dark galleries she went, the soft light fell upon the roots of flowers, and they with new life spread forth in the warm ground, and forced fresh sap to the blossoms above.
The ceremony was to be solemnized according to the Episcopalian forms, and in open church, with a degree of publicity that attracted many spectators, who occupied the front seats of the galleries, and the pews near the altar and along the broad aisle.
It was free, indeed, from the modern blemish of galleries.
Galleries were constructed inside of the palisades; the bastions were heightened, and sentinels were posted day and night.
They passed through the glorious halls of the Louvre, down the staircases, along the cool, dim galleries of sculpture, and out into the enormous court.