galley


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galley,

long, narrow vessel widely used in ancient and medieval times, propelled principally by oars but also fitted with sails. The earliest type was sometimes 150 ft (46 m) long with 50 oars. Rowers were slaves, prisoners of war, or (later) convicts; they were usually chained to benches set along the sides, the center of the vessel being used for cargo. Galleys were decked at the bow and stern but were otherwise open. The typical galley was the trireme, with three banks of oars; smaller and more manageable galleys (biremes) had two banks. These vessels became very large, some reputedly having as many as 40 banks of oars, but smaller vessels were again common by the 1st cent. B.C. When galleys were employed in war, the sides were so designed that they could be raised to afford protection for the rowers. The Romans used hooks to fasten onto enemy vessels and carried bridges for boarding. Galleys were used in the Mediterranean by the French and Venetians until the 17th cent. In modern usage the galley is the kitchen of a ship.

Galley

 

a wooden rowing warship created by the Venetians in the seventh century. It was 40-50 m long and about 6 m wide, with a draft of about 2 m and one row of 16 to 25 pairs of oars. Each oar was operated by five or six slave oarsmen who wore leg chains; the whole crew together with the soldiers was about 450 men. The speed of the galley was up to 7 knots (13 km/hr) in calm weather. It had two masts with sails fore and aft. From the 14th century on, its artillery consisted of five guns. The bow was equipped with an above-water ram. The fleets of all countries had galleys. In Russia, Peter I in the late 17th century created a galley fleet, which developed parallel to the sailing ships until the late 18th century. On the Russian galleys the oarsmen were soldiers.

galley

[′gal·ē]
(engineering)
The kitchen of a ship, airplane, or trailer.
(graphic arts)
A flat, oblong, open-ended tray into which the letters assembled by hand in a composing stick are transferred after the composing stick is full.

galley

The onboard meal service preparation area.

galley

1. any of various kinds of ship propelled by oars or sails used in ancient or medieval times as a warship or as a trader
2. the kitchen of a ship, boat, or aircraft
3. any of various long rowing boats
References in classic literature ?
At the same moment, without giving any audible direction to his crew, he ran the galley abroad of us.
It was but for an instant that I seemed to struggle with a thousand mill-weirs and a thousand flashes of light; that instant past, I was taken on board the galley.
What with the cries aboard the steamer, and the furious blowing off of her steam, and her driving on, and our driving on, I could not at first distinguish sky from water or shore from shore; but, the crew of the galley righted her with great speed, and, pulling certain swift strong strokes ahead, lay upon their oars, every man looking silently and eagerly at the water astern.
The galley was kept steady, and the silent eager look-out at the water was resumed.
Here it is the reverse," said the galley slave; "for he who sings once weeps all his life.
That," said the galley slave, "is like a man having money at sea when he is dying of hunger and has no way of buying what he wants; I say so because if at the right time I had had those twenty ducats that your worship now offers me, I would have greased the notary's pen and freshened up the attorney's wit with them, so that to-day I should be in the middle of the plaza of the Zocodover at Toledo, and not on this road coupled like a greyhound.
Just so," replied the galley slave, "and the offence for which they gave him that punishment was having been an ear-broker, nay body-broker; I mean, in short, that this gentleman goes as a pimp, and for having besides a certain touch of the sorcerer about him.
So he ran to the galley as fast as his legs would carry him.
Let us get on board the galley this instant; and if the dragon is to make a breakfast of us, much good may it do him.
Circe, my father's sister, taught me to be one, and I could tell you, if I pleased, who was the old woman with the peacock, the pomegranate, and the cuckoo staff, whom you carried over the river; and, likewise, who it is that speaks through the lips of the oaken image, that stands in the prow of your galley.
And between this and the smells arising from various pots boiling and bubbling on the galley fire, I was in haste to get out into the fresh air.
The cook stuck his head out of the galley door and grinned encouragingly at me, at the same time jerking his thumb in the direction of the man who paced up and down by the hatchway.