galvanism


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galvanism

[′gal·və‚niz·əm]
(biology)
The use of a galvanic current for medical or biological purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps a corpse would be re-animated; galvanism had given token of such things: perhaps the component parts of a creature might be manufactured, brought together, and endued with vital warmth.
He said the object of his experiments 'was not to produce re-animation, but merely to obtain a practical knowledge how far Galvanism may be employed .
Bread has been made (indifferent) from potatoes; And galvanism has set some corpses grinning, But has not answer'd like the apparatus Of the Humane Society's beginning, By which men are unsuffocated gratis: What wondrous new machines have late been spinning
Prout identified free muriatic acid (hydrochloric acid) in the gastric juice of various animals and humans after a meal and suggested that it was derived from the common salt of the blood by the force of galvanism (electricity).
He states that the creation of a monster like Frankenstein's is considered "as not of impossible occurrence" (5), and she justifies the possibility of such a process: "Perhaps a corpse would be reanimated; galvanism had given token of such things: perhaps the component parts of a creature might be manufactured, brought together, and embued with vital warmth" (Frankenstein [New York: Bantam, 2003] xxvi).
The Vril-ya have automata for servants and mechanical wings for personal flight, and the apparently limitless power supply of vril: "I should call it electricity, except that it comprehends in its manifold branches other forces of nature, to which, in our scientific nomenclature, differing names are assigned, such as magnetism, galvanism, &c.
He also mentioned the possible evolution of heat and extended his investigations to include the effects of electricity, galvanism, and various salts and other chemical agents on the process.
Indeed, one of the first advertisements of the phantasmagoria in France also featured a display of galvanism, whose application, it was claimed, gave "temporary movements to bodies whose life [had] departed.