gamma-ray telescope

gamma-ray telescope

[′gam·ə ‚rā ′tel·ə‚skōp]
(astronomy)
Any device for detecting and determining the directions of extraterrestrial gamma rays, using coincidence or anticoincidence circuits with scintillation or semiconductor detectors to obtain directional discrimination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last June, NASA launched a new telescope called the Fermi Gamma-ray telescope into orbit by strapping it on the back of a rocket.
Swift has three telescopes: A gamma-ray telescope to detect the burst, and X-ray and ultraviolet/optical telescopes to provide rapid follow-up observations, all the while broadcasting the burst location to other observatories.
The scientific objectives of the GLAST mission require a high-energy gamma-ray telescope with:
Third, we will use an innovative method to isolate the CIB from early epochs using data from the Fermi gamma-ray telescope.
Three minutes and 12 seconds after Swifts gamma-ray telescope found the burst, the craft automatically turned its X-ray telescope to the same point in the sky.
The mission's scientific objectives require a high-energy gamma-ray telescope with angular resolution sufficient to identify point sources with objects at other wavelengths, a wide field-of-view that will permit the study of sources that exhibit extreme intensity variations on timescales from seconds to months or longer, and a large effective area to detect a large sample of sources and determine their energy spectra.
India intends to set up one more gamma-ray telescope at Hanle, Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir besides the one that is all set to be transported to the place.
We consider three main applications: pixel detectors in the harsh radiation environment of CMS at LHC; novel SiPM devices for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and an array of Cherenkov detectors spread over kilometers, forming a gamma-ray telescope (CTA).
He reported that observations over many wavelengths, including those made with a gamma-ray telescope aboard the Soviet satellite GRANAT, show that Nova Persei's outburst matches the pattern expected when matter falls onto a disk surrounding a black hole.
The puzzling gamma-ray emitter returned to the limelight late last year when data from a gamma-ray telescope aboard the Soviet orbiter GRANAT showed that on one day in mid-October, 1E1740.
Among the scientific instruments is a gamma-ray telescope developed in West Germany.
These emissions, detected by a sophisticated, balloon-borne gamma-ray telescope, result from collisions between electrons and positrons (the antimatter equivalent of electrons), which destroy the particles and generate gamma-rays.