Garden Spider

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Garden Spider

 

(Ananeus diadematus), a spider of the family Araneidae. The upper side of the abdomen has white spots that form a cross. Length of the female, 20-25 mm; of the male, 10-11 mm. The garden spider is widely distributed in Europe. It makes a vertical, wheel-shaped trapping web to catch insects for food

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use of we Tory is MP I fear the insect-eating garden spider and thousands of other species will be lost permanently Steve Kay
Curtis and Carrel (2000) noted that the garden spider often leaves its web to excrete, and that it generally does so at night; however, it excretes under its web, consistent with their impression that its major predators are birds and predatory wasps.
Of the many species that can be observed in and around the home, the three which are very common are the Garden Spider, the Money Spider and last but certainly not the least, that family favourite, theHouse Spider.
Among males of the yellow garden spider, "all of them do it," she says.
I tested if manipulating food intake affected the size of stabilimenta and other foraging-associated web characteristics of webs spun by the garden spider, Argiope trifasciata.
Stabilimenta of the garden spider Argiope trifasciata: a possible prey attractant.
Garden spiders - or cross spiders as they are also known - are very visible at this time of year and at first appear to be suspended in mid air.
Garden spiders sit patiently in these webs for much of the time and give the impression they are oblivious to your beady eyes.
Among the different silken traps built by spiders is the commonplace, mostly circular web of the garden spider, which weaves spiral strands on supports slung between plants or buildings.
But spider expert Jack Fenwick, of Naturally Wild - an ecology specialist based on Skippers Lane, Middlesbrough - con-firmed that the spider is a common garden spider.
Orb weavers are the most noticeable garden spiders because of their large size, enormous webs and the bright, symmetrical patterns on their abdomens.
Tarantulas are practically harmless; they are the Methuselahs of the spider world, with a life span of up to 20 years, while common garden spiders are lucky to live past their first birthday.