garderobe


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garderobe

1. See wardrobe.
2. A small bedroom or study.
3. Euphemism for a latrine in medieval buildings.

wardrobe, garderobe

A room for the storage of garments.
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The moat and tower garderobe also yielded samples containing plant and invertebrate remains (M.
In the third bedroom a door opens to reveal a 17th century garderobe.
It was a rare, 15th century garderobe, one of only two known examples in Staffordshire, an early, crude, though undercover convenience for the Benedictine ladies.
Even the diet of people who relaxed in the inn has been uncovered by the archeologists, who discovered a garderobe, which is now called a public convenience, together with medieval faeces.
The church interior includes a 14th century wall painting discovered in 1933 and a charming example of an upstairs medieval priest's room with a garderobe.
On the first floor of the west wing are two bedrooms, chapel and garderobe, in the east wing, a sitting room, minstrel gallery, two bathrooms and two bedrooms and on the second floor a further bedroom and loft storage.
Jewel Tower, London, which is well-supplied with garderobes, or toilets.
The castle was a three-storey residence with fireplaces and garderobes - medieval toilets - on each floor.
With no flushable toilets, castles were equipped with special rooms--called garderobes or privies--that had stone or wooden seats with holes cut in the middle.
The stone walls are between 15 and 18 feet thick and contain stairs, galleries and even garderobes, (toilets), within their thickness.
There's also the opportunity to sample the dubious comforts of medieval garderobes.
From dingy dungeon to terrible torture chamber, murder holes to garderobes, Warwick has all the authentic ingredients of a medieval castle steeped in adventure.