garlic mustard


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Related to garlic mustard: Giant Hogweed, Japanese knotweed
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garlic mustard

garlic mustard

Not actually a garlic or mustard. A super highly nutritious healing powerhouse, garlic mustard is one of the first plants to come up early in spring and stays years round. It is said to be one of the most nutritious leafy greens ever analyzed. It's used to treat gangrene, ulcers, has vitamin A, C,(called "North American Wasabi") Dry the leaves, powder it and use as great spice. Can be mixed with horseradish for the familiar greenish colored wasabi used in sushi places. The leaves are shiny with white flowers. Leaves look similar to Ground Ivy, but have sharp toothed edges and smell like mustard, while Ground Ivy has rounded scalloped edges and smells like mint. Both plants are edible, there are no poisonous lookalikes. The best time to consume garlic mustard is when the young shoots come out of the ground, just before the white flowers show up. The stalks are the best part, but you can eat the whole plant. Garlic mustard is very aggressive and will overtake a forest or garden because it's roots put out a chemical that kills beneficial soil organisms that allow other plants to grow. Do not replant it in your garden or property because it will overtake everything. Used for asthma, antiseptic, bronchitis, eczema, antibacterial.
References in periodicals archive ?
Element stewardship abstract for Alliaria peliolata (Alliaria officinalis), garlic mustard.
deHart & Strand (2012) found shifts in predator feeding behavior, likely due to shifts in prey sources due to garlic mustard invasion.
Garlic mustard was chosen as the 2015 Invasive Trail Plant of the Year because of its ability to invade a variety of natural environments, including undisturbed forested areas.
As garlic mustard has a strong flavour but little nutritional value, and the phytoliths are found in pots with terrestrial and marine animal residues, our findings are the first direct evidence for the spicing of food in European prehistoric cuisine," she said.
A member of the mustard family Brassicaceae, garlic mustard got its name because its leaves, when crushed, smell like garlic.
Cavara & Grande (Brassicaceae), or garlic mustard, is an important invasive species in the Midwest and beyond (Nuzzo 1993).
Chiltern Ale & Garlic Mustard is a medium-strength wholegrain mustard with a hint of garlic and liberal amounts of light and refreshing Chiltern Ale.
We eat the greens of garlic mustard all spring, then pull it out just before it bolts (making a horseradishy vinegar from the choicest roots)--often revealing a generous crop of chickweed lurking underneath.
Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) is a native of Europe that has swept across eastern North America, recently turning up in scattered sites around the Northwest.
45, with Chilli & Garlic Sauce, Garlic Flavoured Olive Oil, Idle Garlic, Garlic & Chive Dip, Garlic Mustard Mix.
Event: Four-course prix-fixe dinner (includes a glass of George DuBoeuf beaujolais nouveau) of almond-coated brie with raspberry sauce or escargots in puff pastry with garlic mustard cream sauce, then a spinach salad with goat cheese and toasted walnuts, then an entree choice (filet mignon au poivre, baked spinach-stuffed sole, chicken breast with crab and asparagus plus sherry cream sauce and mashed potatoes) and finally a chocolate mousse tower dessert with French roast coffee.