Garret

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garret

[′gar·ət]
(building construction)
The part of a house just under the roof.

Garret

A room or space located just beneath the roof of a house usually with sloping ceilings; sometimes called an attic.

garret

1. Space within a roof structure; sometimes called an attic.
2. A room, usually with sloping ceilings, just beneath the roof of a house.
References in classic literature ?
The sleeping-room of Cassy was directly under the garret.
Anne's laugh, as blithe and irresistible as of yore, with an added note of sweetness and maturity, rang through the garret.
From the day on which I first tasted blood in the garret my mind was made up; there could be no hum-dreadful-drum profession for me; literature was my game.
The story above, boasted no greater excess than a worm-eaten wash- tub; and the garret landing-place displayed no costlier articles than two crippled pitchers, and some broken blacking-bottles.
Of a day, and whatever was valuable only to one generation of men, and which passed to the garret when that generation passed to the grave, not for safe keeping, but to be out of the way.
The last rays of the sun, entering through the garret window, were fading from Ginevra's face as she sat sleeping in her chair, and holding her child upon her breast.
It was as well that Becky saw them too from her garret, for she and the two students were chattering and laughing there; they had been joking about the appearance of Becky's grandpapa--whose arrival and departure they had witnessed--but she had time to dismiss them, and have her little room clear before the landlord of the Elephant, who knew that Mrs.
His garret was under the roof of a high, five-storied house and was more like a cupboard than a room.
They had no real floor--they had laid old boards in one part to make a place for the family to live; it was all right and safe there, but the other part of the garret had only the joists of the floor, and the lath and plaster of the ceiling below, and if one stepped on this there would be a catastrophe.
A broad ray of light fell into the garret, and showed the workman with an unfinished shoe upon his lap, pausing in his labour.
There was a garret above, pierced with a scuttle over his head; and down through this scuttle came a cat, suspended around the haunches by a string; she had a rag tied about her head and jaws to keep her from mewing; as she slowly descended she curved upward and clawed at the string, she swung downward and clawed at the intangible air.
He lived in a miserable garret doing all manner of literary work for bread.