gas scattering

gas scattering

[′gas ‚skad·ə·riŋ]
(electronics)
The scattering of electrons or other particles in a beam by residual gas in the vacuum system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gas scattering leads to direct contributions to the spectrum from the environmental gas, as well as remote generation of x rays by electrons scattered out of the focussed beam.
This paper will consider the special aspects of x-ray spectrometry and microanalysis performed in the VPSEM-ESEM, especially the impact of gas scattering on spectrum quality, methods of specimen preparation to minimize the effects of gas scattering, practical aspects of qualitative and quantitative x-ray microanalysis, and prospects for future improvements in this area.
X-ray spectrometry performed in the VPSEM-ESEM must inevitably be compromised because of gas scattering compared to the "ideal" situation in the conventional high vacuum SEM.
The inevitable gas scattering, both elastic and inelastic, of a fraction of the primary beam electrons has a significant and frequently severe impact on both qualitative and quantitative Si-EDS x-ray microanalysis in the VPSEM-ESEM.
Useful electron imaging with gas scattering losses as high as 90 % of the total current has been reported, provided enough accumulation time is used (4).
The linear behavior vs pressure is eventually lost at high pressures because gas scattering takes so much current out of the beam striking the alloy wire that the peak intensities of the alloy components begin to decrease significantly.
Gas scattering can profoundly influence the interpretation of a spectrum and thus affect both stages of x-ray microanalysis: (1) qualitative analysis wherein the peaks from gas scattering are assigned to elemental constituents not actually present in the specimen sampled by the unscattered beam, and (2) quantitative analysis, in which the elements contributed by gas scattering will alter the matrix correction calculation by introducing unnecessary corrections for absorption, etc.
Both elastic and inelastic gas scattering effects can be recognized in the same spectrum.
Several strategies have been developed for dealing with gas scattering and the inevitable excitation of portions of the specimen remote from that being interrogated by the direct beam [7].
For the ESEM-class of instruments, which are capable of operating in the pressure range of 100 Pa to 2500 Pa (~ 1 ton to 20 ton) or higher, gas scattering is especially significant, and reducing the gas path length to the practical minimum is necessary to preserve as much spatial resolution as possible.
The strategy of lowering the beam energy to reduce the electron range and to lower the absorption losses for low energy photons that is available in conventional high vacuum operation may be severely restricted in VPSEM-ESEM because of the rapid increase in gas scattering as the beam energy decreases.
Doehne and Bilde-Sorenson and Appel have suggested a method of estimating the skirt contribution to the spectrum through measurements at different pressures to predict the spectrum that would be obtained with no gas scattering (8,9,10).