gaseous diffusion process

gaseous diffusion process

[¦gash·əs di′fyü·zhən ‚präs·əs]
(nucleonics)
A method of separating isotopes in which an isotopic mixture of gases is allowed to diffuse through a porous wall; the lighter molecules pass through the porous wall more readily than the heavier molecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
The centrifuge process is significantly more cost effective than the traditional gaseous diffusion process, using only 5 percent of the electricity used in the current process.
USEC uses a gaseous diffusion process at the two plants to enrich the uranium-235 isotope in uranium hexaflouride gas to the level necessary to produce nuclear fuel for commercial nuclear power plants.
At USEC, uranium is currently enriched through a gaseous diffusion process, which was developed more than 50 years ago.