gavotte

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gavotte

(gəvŏt`), originally a peasant dance of the Gavots in upper Dauphiné, France. A type of circle dance characterized by lively, skipping steps, it was introduced at the court of Louis XIV and was used by Lully in his ballets and operas and by François Couperin and J. S. Bach in their keyboard suites.

Gavotte

 

an old French dance of popular origin. It is in 4/4 or 2/2 time, the tempo is moderate, and it characteristically begins with an upbeat of two quarters or one half and has a clear rhythm. The music of the gavotte is light and elegant, sometimes with pastoral and sometimes with solemn nuances. The gavotte has been known since the 16th century. In the 17th century it became a court dance, graceful and often mincing. In time the gavotte was introduced into ballet and opera (J. B. Lully, J. P. Rameau) and became a component part of instrumental suites (J. S. Bach, G. F. Handel, and others). In Russian music, P. I. Tchaikovsky and A. K. Glazunov created highly artistic forms of the gavotte, and in the 20th century S. S. Prokofiev used gavotte forms (his Classical Symphony and other works).

gavotte

, gavot
1. an old formal dance in quadruple time
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance
References in periodicals archive ?
The composer not only refashioned the notes of his neo-baroque dances, but also introduced a number of baroque compositional techniques not specifically present in the Gavotte and Sarabande--a procedure Pascall colorfully dubs "drag-ins" (p.
In the second movement of the String Quintet, Brahms fashioned a rondo-like hybrid structure that employs both Gavotte and Sarabande in the manner of a baroque dance suite--all in a movement that combines the generic identities of slow movement and scherzo.
The opening section presents a detailed compositional and performance history of the Gavotte and Sarabande and an analysis of their musical content.
After all, the "history" of the Gavotte and Sarabande begins during the period of Brahms's interaction with the Schumanns, his most intensive relations with Joseph Joachim, and his romantic entanglement with Agathe von Siebold.
7) The idea that dances, by definition, include either written or improvised variations, had been expressed a century earlier in Arbeau's Orchesographie (1588); his choreography for the gavotte takes divisions into account.
The only bona fide period set of variations for the gavotte of Sonata no.
David Boyden wrote that in the manuscript known as the `Walsh Anonymous'--so-called because it was discovered bound into a Walsh edition of Corelli's sonatas--the E major gavotte is treated `as a species of variation'.
The lack of a distinct rhythmic profile in the continuous division-like semiquavers of this particular gavotte could explain why it did not engender more variation sets satisfying enough for musicians to have written them down.
The violin part of the gavotte theme is presented in an embellished version, thus illustrating the differences in style and function between ornamentation and variation for the same material.
Recombined fragments of the variations in the Dubourg manuscript, blended with embellished sections of the gavotte theme, appear on the first page of Stockholm, Roman Coll.
The Walsh Anonymous contains a twice-ornamented version of the F major gavotte within the context of the complete sonata, and the gavotte with five variations at the end of the manuscript (after Sonata no.
The gavotte preceding the set of five variations is also embellished, interestingly, with some of the same figuration as Dubourg's decorated gavotte.