geminate

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Related to gemination: Taurodontism

geminate

[′jem·ə·nət]
(biology)
Growing in pairs or couples.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sources of gemination and gemination as a morpheme in Bole.
d) special gemination (strengthening after a long syllable) of trisyllabic and five-syllable words,
Excluding all the possible instances of reduplication caused by West Germanic gemination, and those which are mere clusters of two originally separate consonants, Foley (1903) gives a list of 98 words with <CC> digraphs representing phonemically single consonants.
Yet, this raises considerable difficulties with regard to explaining how foot-final lengthening can be realised via gemination of h in Seto Estonian or why foot-final lengthening is not observed in all languages.
Thus Hogg refers to Luick when discussing palatalisation (260-261,263,275), assibilation (272), assibilation of [sc] (271), fricative voicing (283-284), development of velars (289), gemination (294), consonant loss (297), epenthesis (298), assimilation (300-301), and consonant shifts (306).
For gemination in Semitic, especially Akkadian, see Kouwenberg 1997.
The data collected by Arvo Laanest (1986 : 33, 57-59) concerning the lengthening potential of single consonants in Ingrian dialects are slightly at variance with those of Gordon, yet they too indicate that the gemination of single stops occurs consistently only when the stop is preceded by a stressed CV syllable, and that the variation of the duration of the geminates following such syllables only appears as a rare fluctuation which Laanest does not consider worthy of a more detailed discussion.
23) Obviously, the gemination characteristic for the process of adjective and adverb comparison also results in a cluster, but it is not possible to uncritically pose long realisations for ME consonants.
12:11, and the assimilation of n to d would normally result in gemination (ben dan > * hidddn, not bdddri).
Until now, lengthening alternation has normally been described simply as gemination (Nigol 1994 : 10; Keem, Kasi 2002 : 26-30), and it has been excluded from the system of grade alternation.
This led us to raise the question how far one can take the concept of MOD constraints: can it be extended to gemination, retroflexion and voicing?
Old English ele entered into the language as an early borrowing to undergo the process of i-umlaut, but it was borrowed too late for consonant gemination.