gemology

(redirected from gemmologist)
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Related to gemmologist: gemologist

gemology

[je′mäl·ə·jē]
(mineralogy)
The science concerned with the identification, grading, evaluation, fashioning, and other aspects of gemstones.
References in periodicals archive ?
The education of the country's future gemmologists is an important part of the Danat mandate and promise.
Mr Pardieu will be supporting renowned British gemmologist and Gemological Institute of America (GIA) South East Asia director Kenneth Scarratt, who will head a new state-of-the-art pearl and gem testing laboratory in Bahrain.
The multiple shadow edges can understandably create confusion for gemmologists.
Ian's reputation for industry excellence spread far and wide, and his gemmological laboratory was recognized by both the Accredited Gemmologists Association in the USA and the International Coloured Gemstone Association.
The seminar will be delivered by international gemmologist Mr.
Ten participants from Gems sector have been enrolled for this training course, which is being conducted under the supervision of Ilyas Shah, a gemmologist of PGJDC.
Although uncommon, the stones covered are within the range of those that may be seen by a practising gemmologist.
A report by Warren Boyd, a noted gemmologist, on the initial ruby samples stated that: "The rubies were of very good colour saturation and could be described as an intense purplish red colour.
On each day of the five-day event, five seminars will be offered by DANAT's team of experienced gemmologists including the Research Director, Stefanos Karampelas who has published roughly 40 papers on gemmology in renowned scientific journals; Executive Director, Abeer Al Alawi, who has accumulated over 25 years' experience in the gemstone testing industry, in addition to other specialists including Vincent Pardieu from VP Consulting and Peter Balogh from the Prehistoric Foundation.
We have an in-house team of highly skilled experts in modern and antique jewellery and qualified gemmologists who will be working with the Assay Office to obtain further independent gradings.
Emeralds of gem market importance now have to be accompanied through their commercial wanderings by certificates of origin as well as statements showing whether or not their color has been "improved," so gemmologists will find excellent examples of what they must now seek inside the stones.
Although oriented toward mineral collectors, some items of interest to gemmologists that appeared in 2014 include tourmaline from Brazil, Tanzania and Nepal; gem-quality wurtzite and colour-change axinite-(Mg) from Merelani, Tanzania; demantoid from Iran; benitoite from California; and daylight-luminescent hyalite opal from Mexico (as reported in this issue of The Journal).