gene suppression


Also found in: Medical.

gene suppression

[′jēn sə‚presh·ən]
(genetics)
The development of a normal phenotype in a mutant individual or cell due to a second mutation either in the same gene or in a different gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is an introduction to technologies for gene suppression as well as molecular diagnostics to detect and monitor gene expression.
Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) has become a staple of the research community for silencing genes, but identifying the most effective shRNA sequence to provide the greatest level of gene suppression often presents a problem.
Comment: Page 22 How patients shared their experiences: Page 25 breast cancer research focuses on gene suppression RESEARCHERS at Cardiff University are developing a treatment that could reverse the spread of breast cancer cells.
The hypothesis was that the gene suppression would act like a clogged pipe, creating an abundance of compounds that would have later become phenylalanine in a normal plant.
This knowledge allows scientists to explore gene suppression, a possible key to unlocking a cure for dozens of diseases, he said.
Riggs in 1983 theorized that the X, compared with other chromosomes, is enriched in some DNA sequence that facilitates gene suppression.
Biochemists from NYU Langone Medical Center found that these epigenetic changes in mice and laboratory experiments remove the blocking mechanism of a protein complex long known for gene suppression, and transitions the complex to a gene activating role instead.
The two key challenges to RNAi-based therapies are ensuring efficient drug delivery and avoiding 'off-target' gene suppression.
shRNA is useful where long-term gene suppression is required, or where the cells are resistant to other delivery methods.
Effective Gene Suppression Using Small Interfering RNA in Hard-to- Transfect Human T Cells.
Post-transcriptional gene suppression is an exciting technology with many potential applications," said Sujay K.