general relativity


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Related to general relativity: general relativity theory

general relativity

See relativity, general theory.

general relativity

[¦jen·rəl ‚rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The theory of Einstein which generalizes special relativity to noninertial frames of reference and incorporates gravitation, and in which events take place in a curved space.
References in periodicals archive ?
A theoretical explanation of the Shnoll effect on the basis of General Relativity follows.
We already knew that the predictions of general relativity are extremely accurate for distances within the solar system, and now we can say that they are accurate for distances of 100 million light-years," said Beth Reid of NASA.
Using (1) to (6) into the field equations of General Relativity [3, see p.
Many of these alternate theories do just as good a job as General Relativity of predicting behavior within our Solar System.
Failure of fundamentals of the Einsteinian general relativity
The central tenant of general relativity is that gravity is a pseudo-force due to the curvature of space-time.
A black hole is, almost by definition, the breakdown of Einstein's general relativity.
The theory of General Relativity predicts the existence of black holes as regions in which the space and time are distorted so that nothing can escape them.
He discusses special and general relativity and the cosmological versions of both, properties of the gravitational field, particle production in five-dimensional cosmological relativity, properties of gravitational waves in an expanding universe, spiral galaxy rotation curves in the Brane world theory in five dimensions, testing cosmological general relativity against high redshift observations, homogeneous spaces and Bianchi classifications, and similar topics.
Albert Einstein presents special theory of relativity: general relativity theory to follow, 1905.
Written by outstanding researchers directly involved with the scientific program of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the book begins with a brief review of general relativity before going on to describe the physics of gravitational waves and the astrophysical sources of gravitational radiation.

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