general relativity


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Related to general relativity: general relativity theory

general relativity

See relativity, general theory.

general relativity

[¦jen·rəl ‚rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The theory of Einstein which generalizes special relativity to noninertial frames of reference and incorporates gravitation, and in which events take place in a curved space.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the past three decades, quantum mechanics had sucked much of the young physics talent into figuring out its weird and wonderful practical consequences, leaving general relativity in the long grass.
They have to at least understand the semantics and hermeneutics of Einstein and General Relativity a little better than usual: not from the said hijackers (who have no ontological, substantial relation to Einstein whatsoever), but from the solitary few who are real Einsteinian experts and inheritors.
While Newton's theory of gravity is mostly good enough to describe the motions of the solar system, it is around very dense objects like pulsars and black holes that general relativity becomes indispensable.
It's possible that for many physicists, general relativity was just a step too far.
Aside from unifying General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, identifying what Dark Energy and Dark Matter that led to identifying two Parallel Universes, we revealed the universal formula behind this historical discovery.
2] ln [[R + h]/R] is just the error caused by the space effect of the general Relativity.
Einstein's general relativity makes all the predictions of Newtonian gravitation with tinyand not so tiny in certain astronomical domainscorrections.
Shortly after Einstein published his general relativity theory, the Dutch physicist, Willem de Sitter, solved the general relativity equations without Einstein's cosmological constant to describe what appeared to be a static unchanging universe.
It was primarily Wheeler (and Britain's Dennis Sciama) who in the '60s revived general relativity as a vital science with important things to tell us about cosmology and astrophysics.
With general relativity, Einstein introduced such background independence to physics; it turned out that space and time could be curved and warped by matter and energy, an irregular geometry that we experience as gravity.
On the other hand, as pointed out by Pauli (1958), the theoretical framework of general relativity actually allows the existence of the (antigravity) coupling of different sign.
But I have read the opening paragraph numerous times and I still do not get it: "Einstein's theory of general relativity is based on the revolutionary suggestion that gravity is not a force like other forces but a consequence of the fact that space-time is not flat, as had been previously assumed In general relativity, space-time is curved, or "warped", by the distribution of mass and energy in it.

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