generative grammar


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Related to generative grammar: universal grammar

generative grammar

[′jen·rəd·iv ′gram·ər]
(computer science)
A set of rules that describes the valid expressions in a formal language on the basis of a set of the parts of speech (formally called the set of metavariables or phrase names) and the alphabet or character set of the language.
References in periodicals archive ?
The formal languages studied in logic suggest, to a philosopher at any rate, what might be involved in a generative grammar of a natural language: namely, rules that generate indefinitely many well-formed strings from a finite number of elements, and rules that assign semantic values to sentences on the basis of an assignment of values to their parts.
The methodological constraint of language (and grammar) autonomy that generative grammar imposes on itself follows directly from the "Galilean style in science" it adopts.
Despite the significant breakthrough in the inclusion of grammatical functions into the realm of generative grammar, the definitions of the relations are still quite inconclusive.
This artificial and limited creation of an actual speaker of Classical Chinese derives directly from the concept of generative grammar that underlies Gassmann's syntax descriptions in Grundstrukturen; he justifiably holds that such exercises, because of the required rigor of expression, can be used as a "valuable heuristic means" (Grundstrukturen, p.
Moreover, even if the MP does not acknowledge the metatheoretical role that generative grammar used to assign to AcqT, it is however out of question that acquisition continue to be an experimental field of primary interest for theoretical linguistics of any orientation.
Like "cognitive grammar" (as championed by Ronald Langacker, Bernd Heine, or William Croft), Enonciation was partly born of a reaction to generative grammar, which (at least in its early stages) was not interested in the origin of utterances, in the relation between speaker and utterance, or in the specific situation in which a given sentence is produced.
4), but also cautions: "Much of the work on syntax of individual dialects takes as its theoretical framework generative grammar, based largely on artificially generated sentences devoid of context.
Apart from introductory and summary chapters, the body of the book, comprising chapters 2 through 5, devotes more than half its space to a presentation and critique of the so-called New Historical View, a school of chant scholarship associated with Leo Treitler and Helmut Hucke (making too little of the differences between them and attributing to the latter an affinity with Chomskian generative grammar that is alien to his intellectual tradition).
By comparing Chomsky's generative grammar with Deleuze and Guattari's theory of language, he shows that they carefully discriminate between different kinds of creativity.
Studying the acquisition of intensifiers is also interesting for another reason: given that intensifiers (The president himself said it) are formally indistinguishable from reflexive anaphors (He saw himself) in English and differ from the latter only in their distribution, investigating their acquisition amounts to intruding into one of the core areas of Generative Grammar.
The Generative Grammar dealing only with structures could not solve this problem but the minimalist approach has made it possible by introducing semantic features.
We were able to have a further discussion about structuralist approaches to language description using the models as reference points to explain the static and responsive nature of structuralist description and, since it had been introduced by the students themselves, the conceptual difference that a "process-oriented" theory like generative grammar introduces.