generative grammar


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to generative grammar: universal grammar

generative grammar

[′jen·rəd·iv ′gram·ər]
(computer science)
A set of rules that describes the valid expressions in a formal language on the basis of a set of the parts of speech (formally called the set of metavariables or phrase names) and the alphabet or character set of the language.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is more, if one accepts the grammaticality idea, it creates a fertile, interesting field of research, with plenty of scope for developing research projects to "sell" to funding agencies, about constructing generative grammars, or partial grammars, for various languages, and about identifying universal features common to the generative grammars of all languages.
It is important to note from this that the outputs of the generative grammar are also psychological representations.
The formal languages studied in logic suggest, to a philosopher at any rate, what might be involved in a generative grammar of a natural language: namely, rules that generate indefinitely many well-formed strings from a finite number of elements, and rules that assign semantic values to sentences on the basis of an assignment of values to their parts.
Within generative grammar, the idea was first applied by Hale and Key ser (1993).
Thus a generative grammar attempts to specify what the speaker actually knows, not what he may report about his knowledge.
In the Minimalist model, the lexicon (the mental dictionary of lexical items or words with their linguistic properties) has taken on a greater role in the grammar than it had in earlier generative grammar theory.
The layered organization of the NP, and possible parallels with the clausal syntagm, have been investigated in various linguistic frameworks (also in generative grammar, and in cognitive grammar), first in relation to nominalization, and then afterwards also in nonderived nominals.
A Generative Grammar for 3D Manufacturing, Master of Science of Architecture Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
In this respect, Tomasello's analysis of observed speech in the field of language acquisition is given particular relevance as central in the CL debate on one of the main tenets of Generative Grammar.
Chapter 4 presents a lengthy interlude on the drawbacks of various versions of generative grammar, in particular with respect to its usual treatment of the passive construction.
Besides the generative grammar paradigm, one finds the communication-and-cognition perspective which according to Van Valin and La Polla embraces about fifteen linguistic schools, such as Functional Grammar, Role and Reference Grammar, or Cognitive Grammar (Syntax, Meaning and Function, p 11-12).
I found the data intriguing, since one of my interests at the time was the comparative syntax of Latin and English and another was the development of generative semantics, loosely spun off from standard transformational generative grammar.