defect

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defect

Crystallog a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid

Defect

In lumber, an irregularity occurring in or on wood that will tend to impair its strength, durability, or utility value.

defect

[′dē‚fekt]
(science and technology)
An irregularity that spoils the appearance or impairs the usefulness or effectiveness of an object or a material by causing weakness or failure.

defect

In wood, a fault that may reduce its durability, usefulness, or strength.

defect

References in periodicals archive ?
Ibdah said for infants with the genetic defect, special formulas are available that both reduce the amount of fat and change the types of fat that the babies get.
About half of the cases of congenital hearing loss are caused by genetic defects.
A person with a genetic defect might not be able to spoon up what life offers.
Using mice carrying the genetic defect that causes the disease in people, Boston researchers showed that cell membranes in the lungs, pancreas, and intestines--the organs most affected by cystic fibrosis in people--have abnormally low levels of a fatty acid called docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).
The technology could also be used in the expression of specific genes in order to complement a genetic defect.
The Cd36 genetic defect appears in roughly 2 to 3 percent of Japanese, Thai, and African people but in less than 1 percent of whites in the United States.
While no one has yet identified a specific genetic defect that causes prostate cancer, scientists have mapped three locations on chromosomes that probably harbor mutations predisposing a man to the malignancy.
The Company conducted these studies using mice with the same genetic defect that causes lung cancer in humans.
The research shows the genetic defects mainly arise anew in fathers, especially those who are older.
Some 87% of women whose embryos were checked for genetic defects went on to have a healthy baby, or were about to give birth to one.
In the new study, researchers transplanted retinal cells from fetal mice, newborns, or adults to mice that, because of genetic defects, had lost their rods and thus their night vision.
However, the mechanisms for the effect of older paternal age on genetic defects are not well understood.