genetic marker

(redirected from genetic determinant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

genetic marker

[jə¦ned·ik ′märk·ər]
(genetics)
A gene whose phenotypic expression is easily discerned and thereby can be used to identify an individual or a cell that carries it, or as a probe to mark a nucleus, chromosome, or locus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Progress in Defining a Comprehensive Model of SLE Pathogenesis Based on the Underlying Genetic Determinants
Hyper homocysteinemia: genetic determinants and selected mouse models.
Among the areas scientists expect to tease open with the new tools are whether there are genetic determinants for various equine illnesses, the functional role that contributing genes play in disease, and the identification of genes that regulate desirable traits.
Studies on the perilipin gene--several of which have already been published by HNRCA authors--are important first steps in uncovering significant genetic determinants for obesity and type 2 diabetes risk.
The difference may be due to genetic determinants of variation in underlying maternal inflammation or differences in exposure to causes of inflammatory activation.
Researchers involved in secondments between RUBICON participants will investigate genetic determinants, circadian clock, extracellular matrix components, soluble biochemical factors and intracellular signalling pathways, ER stress and oxidative components involved in connective tissue homeostasis and pathogenesis.
Although the exact mechanisms that initiate onset remain unclear, these insights have been translated into the pool of novel therapeutic targets, which may potentially become disease-modifying therapies by aligning to the disease processes and some genetic determinants of PD.
Scientists in Genetics and Epidemiology at Joslin were interested in finding out whether there were genetic determinants of CHD specific to diabetic patients.
Among the topics are genetic determinants of bacterial pathogenicity, fimbrial adhesins: adhesive molecules on a "stalk," whether toxins acting on intracellular targets can by friends as well as foes, the bacterial life in a vacuole, and bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides.
Variations occur mainly in genetic determinants of virulence and antimicrobial drug susceptibility.
They address biological contributions to personality; information and external conditions like aging and central auditory processing; and such social aspects as the environmental and genetic determinants of sociopolitical attitudes and the cognitive nature of prejudiced individuals.