hereditary disease

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hereditary disease

[hə′red·ə‚ter·ē di‚zēz]
(medicine)
A genetically determined illness transmitted from parent to child.
References in periodicals archive ?
New Delhi [India], September 1 ( ANI ): The medical science has given hope to the millions of couples who want to experience parenthood but couldn't do so because of various issues like physical deformities, infertility, and genetic disorders.
According to the World Health Organisation, the most cost-effective strategy for reducing the burden of genetic disorders is to complement disease management with prevention programmes.
Muscat: Young couples who plan to wed are encouraged to have premarital screening tests to determine whether they carry genes that would be passed along to their children as genetic disorders, a health expert said during a lecture held at Scientific College of Design on Sunday.
The diseases include phenylketonuria, sickle cell anemia, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, and Friedreich's ataxia-just a few of the more than 1000 genetic disorders that are well-described and many more that are not.
KARACHI -- Despite steady surge in varied genetic disorders in the country the local health insurance companies are yet to take these into account and reimburse the high cost of treatment for such disorders.
Dr Abdulkareem Sultan Al Olama, CEO of Al Jalila Foundation, commented: " We believe that when patients are freed from the emotional burden of worrying about funding their treatment, they are in a better mental state to focus on their recovery, Tawam Hospital is an ideal partner in this endeavour, courtesy of its reputation for world-class standards in oncology and genetic disorders.
Dr S Suresh, Chief Medical Director, MD, MediScan said: "Awareness amongst masses and support from the government is critical for diagnosis and treatment of rare genetic disorders.
In case of autosomal recessive disorders, the risk of having an affected child is 25 %, wherein the partners are carriers for the same genetic disorder.
GENETIC disorders are the biggest killer of children aged 14 and under in the United Kingdom.
Thalassaemia and Down's syndrome are common genetic disorders among Indians and can be predicted by genetic testing
Students are inherently interested in human genetics and genetic disorders.
One baby in 33 in the UK suffers from a genetic disorder, with many of the conditions having no current cure.