genetic homeostasis


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genetic homeostasis

[jə¦ned·ik ‚hō·mē·ō′stā·səs]
(genetics)
The tendency of Mendelian populations to maintain a constant genetic composition.
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Epistasis plays a critical role in a variety of theories of evolution and speciation, including Wright's (1978) shifting-balance theory, Schmalhausen's (1949) theory of stabilizing selection, Waddington's (1957) theory of canalization and genetic homeostasis, Mayr's (1963) concept of the unity of the genotype and genetic revolutions at speciation, Carson's (1968, 1982) founder-flush theory of speciation, and Templeton's (1980a,b) theory of genetic transilience.
It may also cause reversed responses to directional selection (Gimelfarb 1986), changes in phenotypic and genetic correlations among traits across environments (Nechiporenko and Dragavtsev 1986; Schlichting 1989; de Jong 1990), genetic homeostasis (Gillespie and Turelli 1989), and gene-culture coevolution under the influence of familial environments (Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman 1981).
Studies of genetic homeostasis have often compared the morphological variance of inbred lines to that of the [F.