genetic variance


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Related to genetic variance: environmental variance, additive genetic variance

genetic variance

[jə¦ned·ik ‚ver·ē·əns]
(genetics)
The phenotypic variance in a population that is due to genetic heterogeneity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ju (2001) investigated the reduction of additive genetic variance while simulating various selection methods for Hanwoo cattle.
The high additive genetic variance, heritability and repeatability estimates obtained here suggested the possibility of improving LY, IY, PY, and YD by genetic selection.
a] is the additive genetic variance due to the additive effects of alleles at the loci controlling the quantitative trait; [[?
In genetic breeding programs, SSRs have been used for different purposes, such as assisted selection, genetic variance characterization, linkage disequilibrium analysis, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) mapping (BERNARDO, 2008; EATHINGNTON et al.
With the parity number increases, the proportional increases of variance for herd-year and residual effects deemed relatively higher than the additive genetic variance, indicating more environmental influences on SCS increase.
The combined system will be used by Variagenics and its pharmaceutical, clinical research, and other drug development partners for use in identifying genetic variances, known as genotyping and haplotyping.
Variagenics Vice President of Research and Genomics, added, "With companies announcing progress in identifying SNPs, never before has there been such a wealth of genetic variance data available for study.
Estimation of genetic variance and covariance components for weaning weight in Simmental cattle.
Genetic variance explains a large amount of the variability in traits such as the weight and portion of retail cuts, and the amount of trimmed fat and bone, suggesting that direct selection could improve lean productivity.
Covance is committed to helping its pharmaceutical clients increase the success rate of new drugs in clinical trials by applying the understanding of individual genetic variance to drug development.
Estimates of additive genetic variance for ultrasound measurements and carcass measurements by multiple trait analysis are presented in Table 3.