genioglossus


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Related to genioglossus: hyoglossus, geniohyoid, styloglossus

genioglossus

[¦jē·nē·ō¦glä·səs]
(anatomy)
An extrinsic muscle of the tongue, arising from the superior mental spine of the mandible.
References in periodicals archive ?
24) In a study of hyoid suspension as a one-stage multilevel procedure in 22 patients, Richard et al reported an overall success rate of 72%, with no difference in outcomes between patients who did and did not undergo genioglossus advancement.
Its disadvantages are that it does not enlarge the oral cavity; genioglossus muscles can become detached, negating its effectiveness; and it is not effective in more severe OSA cases.
High frequency sampling techniques have recently been used to define single motor units (SMUs) within the genioglossus with illuminating results (100-103).
Application of negative expiratory pressure during expiration and activity of genioglossus in humans.
We excluded from our study patients who had undergone UPPP without tonsillectomy and those who had undergone tonsillectomy/UPPP simultaneously with another procedure, such as genioglossus advancement, septoplasty, or hyoid suspension.
Opposing muscarinic and nicotinic modulation of hypoglossal motor output to genioglossus muscle in rats in vivo.
The patient was observed in the high dependency unit for an extended period as prolonged vigil is recommended for delayed presentation of respiratory compromise due to pharyngeal oedema, genioglossus haematoma and aspiration".
Some of these patients underwent genioglossus advancement and/or hyoid suspension.
The muscles of the upper airway, including the sternohyoid, genioglossus, and tensor veli palatini, work synergistically to dilate or stiffen the extrathoracic airway and to maintain its caliber (Fig.
Genioglossus muscle responses to upper airway pressure changes: afferent pathways.
Among the possible causes of upper airway obstruction are the posterior displacement of a normal-sized tongue secondary to micrognathia and/or retrognathia, the loss of support of the genioglossus muscle, and negative pressure in the pharynx during swallowing and inspiration.
When transitioning from wake to sleep, muscular relaxation occurs and genioglossus tone has been shown to decrease more so in patients with SDB compared to controls.