genitive

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genitive

(jĕn`ĭtĭv) [Lat.,=genetic], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically used to refer to a possessor. The term is used in the grammar of other languages, but the phenomenon referred to may not closely resemble a Latin genitive; thus a Latin genitive will be translated by a number of different cases in Finnish. Such forms in English as his and father's are said to be genitive, or, more often, possessive.
References in periodicals archive ?
As discussed later on for Albanian, the distribution of AL resembles that of a demonstrative: according to the data I analyzed for Standard Romanian, its presence triggers ungrammaticality when the preceding noun is definite, whilst it is obligatory when the modified NP is indefinite (except for deverbal nouns, after which this element appears as 'non-inflected'); moreover, AL is required when an AP occurs between the noun and the genitival phrase: in this context the function of AL may be hypothesized to be 'resumptive', i.
The content and usage distinction of nominative and genitival phrases is usually explained by indefinite character of the former ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
An example of such a derived possessive variant is given in (4c), where -- as will become clear in the course of this paper -- van behaves as a genitival suffix.
Textual problems are discussed by assertion, without reference to the scholars who have considered them in the past: he for Grendel's mother at lines 1392 and 1394 would profit from mention of Hoops, Kommentar zum Beowulf, 156-7; though after what has been said in the first chapter about the scribes of poetic texts participating in the creative act of composition as they transmit the text, I should have expected a return to heo by emendation, perhaps by scribal confusion of the genitival magan (line 1391) from mage or maege (fem.
Turner's view (1927: 232) that, in the writing system employed in the Kharosthi inscriptions discovered by Sir Marc Aurel Stein (Gandhari, Niya), the special symbol s used for writing the genitival ending -asa (< -asya) represented a lenited s is untenable (see von Hiniiber 2001: 178).
In Estonian scalar intensifying reduplication can be realized as a coordinate construction, a comparative construction, or a genitival attributive construction.
2186a MS drihten wereda, a common genitival phrase for ~the Lord of Hosts' to be emended to drihten Wedera (generally accepted, though not by E.
Ehlich, in his study of deixis in Hebrew, comes to the conclusion that zu is exclusively used as relative pronoun (Ehlich 1979: 639)--for the interpretation of zu as expressing a genitival relationship see also Allegro (1955: 311)--while Chiera states that zu sometimes corresponds to a demonstrative (1996: 1114).
who aligns the -ani- (d)feminies with the Greek suffix -[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], which makes genitival derivates (19) to thematic stems.
Although Egypt is well known for its "of "-particle bita', there are pockets in Middle Egypt in which suyl (known from Palestine) is the genitival exponent (Tell el-'Amarna, Asyut, Suhag, etc.
One of the most vexing problems discussed is the development of the genitival exponents in the modern Arabic dialects, paralleling Akkadian sa, Hebrew sel, Ge'ez za-, and Biblical Aramaic di (pp.
Then syntax is the organizing principle: adverbial uses of the noun (139-40) and the genitival relationship (140-43).