genitive

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genitive

(jĕn`ĭtĭv) [Lat.,=genetic], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically used to refer to a possessor. The term is used in the grammar of other languages, but the phenomenon referred to may not closely resemble a Latin genitive; thus a Latin genitive will be translated by a number of different cases in Finnish. Such forms in English as his and father's are said to be genitive, or, more often, possessive.
References in periodicals archive ?
In concerned cases it is possible to change possessive phrases by genitival combinations, constructions with adjective are usually not possible.
Very often they correspond to genitival phrases in other languages and in some languages they can be used as a major pattern of attributive possession.
Thus, genitival phrases tend to express animated, definite, and complete belonging; the combination NN+N has as a major meaning of inalienable and indefinite belonging; locative patterns mark inanimate and partial belonging.
It seems that for the reason of emphasised and animate possessor in genitival phrase, an elative pattern was grammaticalized to express definite partial and inanimate belonging: NGen+NPx ~ Nel+N.
One could interpret this element in the learner's derivational output as a genitival prefix.
Or, to put it more formally, genitival spell-out by means of an adpositional marker is overgeneralized to multimembered (i.
2] learner seems to use this element as a genitival case suffix attached to the stem of the possessed noun; in other words, he tries to realize the Turkish morphological procedure of expressing genitive case by means of van.
Scalar reduplication is manifested in coordinate constructions, comparative constructions, and genitival attributive constructions.
41) Since vrdd/zf-derivation was the most productive mechanism for making genitival derivatives to personal nouns and proper names in Proto-Indo-Iranian, it can be expected to have exerted an analogical influence on the functionally and semantically very similar stems in *-aHna- and so to have led to the adoption of the devf-form *-aHniH-(d) as an alternative to *-aHnaH-.
The first thing to note is that the starting point for this explanation, *HnariH- 'the woman of the *Hnar-': *Hnar- 'nobleman', is a vrddhi derivative with "lateral" meaning and that before the creation of the "athematic" type, vrddhi derivation must have been one of the prime ways of making genitival derivatives meaning 'woman/wife of x' to personal nouns and proper names.
0 In sum, the best approach to the "thematic" indrani-type is to align it with Vedic and Avestan genitival derivatives in -ana-/-ana-, and to explain it and its "athematic" counterpart as different morphological responses to the same semantic problem--the need to distinguish the meaning 'woman/wife of x' from the more common and productive 'daughter of x' in feminine genitival derivatives.
anam, which marks agents, indirect objects, objects of prepositions, nouns in genitival relationship, and optinnally direct objects (Sundermann 1989: 154-55; cf.