genitive


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Related to genitive: double genitive, accusative

genitive

(jĕn`ĭtĭv) [Lat.,=genetic], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically used to refer to a possessor. The term is used in the grammar of other languages, but the phenomenon referred to may not closely resemble a Latin genitive; thus a Latin genitive will be translated by a number of different cases in Finnish. Such forms in English as his and father's are said to be genitive, or, more often, possessive.
References in periodicals archive ?
49 sasthi sthaneyoga, which provides the genitive with the technical meaning 'in place of', are invoked only when there is doubt in the relation the genitive case signifies, ii) Since the purpose of language use from a speaker's perspective is that another person understands the meaning the speaker wishes to convey, a speech unit should be caused by a meaning and not vice versa.
Some speakers allow the suffix -n- together with the following local case markers also to be compounded with the genitive (although such forms normally do not occur in speech due to their excessive complexity):
To sum up our discussion so far, it appears that while some herb names are clearly compounds (especially noun-noun compounds), the status of many others--in particular of those whose modifiers are adjectives, prepositional phrases or genitive constructions--is questionable.
Genitives of species and subspecies nomina derived from personal names should not be emended.
First, we capture all pairs (head, dependent) with PoS-tag of the "head" part equal to "VERB" and with a certain grammatical case of the "dependent" part, say, "gent" for the genitive.
The Genitive Case in Dutch and German: A Study of Morphosyntactic Change in Codified Languages
Special attention is given to the genitive construction and the NP of characterization.
When epithets of the name-giving taxa occur, they must be in the genitive, if they are declinable.
I am interested in Foucault's definition of the genitive, but not enough to look it up.
The two infixes form five functions as the examp/es show: 1) the haq `the rzght path': The constituents are nouns and the infix -e- represents the genitive marker 2) sah ib-e- I/rn `scho/ar': The constituents are nouns and the infix -e- represents the agentive partic/e va/a which a/so shows possession `someone having something' 3) da/at-e-a/ija `h/gh court': The constituents are noun and adjective and the infix only /inks the constituents phono/ogica/y 4)jJ-o-rasux
The aim was to find out which words for 'human being' prefer the nominative forms mina and ma 'I' and which prefer the genitive forms minu and mu 'my' among their three left collocates.
Instead, the dictionary provides the ending of the noun in the genitive case, as these endings are often problematic for users.