genitive

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Related to genitive case: accusative case, ablative case, dative case

genitive

(jĕn`ĭtĭv) [Lat.,=genetic], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically used to refer to a possessor. The term is used in the grammar of other languages, but the phenomenon referred to may not closely resemble a Latin genitive; thus a Latin genitive will be translated by a number of different cases in Finnish. Such forms in English as his and father's are said to be genitive, or, more often, possessive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are definiteness and the structure of noun phrases in Slavic, evidence from colloquial Slovenian for a definite article in the AP, the case for a genitive case in Bulgarian, reciprocity expressions, about the vocative, and Slavic clitic systems in a typological perspective.
Instead, the dictionary provides the ending of the noun in the genitive case, as these endings are often problematic for users.
Nouns occurring in grammatical contexts requiring the genitive case normally take one of three endings, a, -u, and -y (or its variant -i).
4) That these names are in the genitive case is evident from "Bhasa's" Pancaratra, where Bhisma has such an inscription read out to him because of his failing eyesight as "Arjunasya" (Pancaratra III, after verse 18).
common case in noun phrases following friend of, classified by the type of dependent noun (definite and indefinite noun phrases) Types of Definite NP Indefinite NP dependent noun Common Genitive Common Genitive case case human proper 194 (68.
Examples include the English possessive clitic's from an earlier genitive case ending, (3) the Irish first-person plural pronoun muid from an earlier verbal inflection (Bybee et al.
The translator of [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], who put [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] into the Greek genitive case (ending in -ou and dependent upon [beta]o[tau][alpha][nu][eta][nu]), had the same Hebrew letters in his Vorlage as the Masoretic [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "herb--grass sowing seed"; but he grouped and construed them differently.
Suffixal alternation or the grade alternation of unstressed non-initial syllables includes trisyllabic forms of nouns in genitive case (from the beginning of word or primary-stressed syllable), which are mainly in Q1 or Q2, and where there is a short consonant on the boundary of the second and third syllable, but a geminate in the partitive case (and the rest of the following cases).
genitive Case or the equivalent of 's in English) identifying them as such.
In these phrases endings of subjective cases as genitive -len and ablative -les, and locative cases as elative -is and rarely inessive -in can be used as morphologic markers of the possessee; in genitive case the possessor is marked twice by possessive suffixes.
The genitive case marks 'brother' as the (adnominal) possessor argument of 'net'.