genitive

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genitive

(jĕn`ĭtĭv) [Lat.,=genetic], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically used to refer to a possessor. The term is used in the grammar of other languages, but the phenomenon referred to may not closely resemble a Latin genitive; thus a Latin genitive will be translated by a number of different cases in Finnish. Such forms in English as his and father's are said to be genitive, or, more often, possessive.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, it would be theoretically possible to interpret the genitive often found with the noun xsa[?
Such nouns must normally occur with a specifier, typically a genitive noun phrase (e.
They are exemplified by the converted noun in Rita's love of cats, where the genitive corresponds to the "experiencer"--{src{loc}}--of the related verb of emotion.
Thus, not only are the earlier genitives more explicitly defined here as necessarily referring to the faithfulness of Christ but the content of this faithfulness is also defined.
the nominalization cannot take any complements and the genitive NP cannot be object genitive--this despite the fact that the nominalizations that occur in these expressions all have more than one argument, and many of them can ordinarily take complements and/or combine with the object genitive.
Like other first declension genitives, these forms end in a light trochee, and like other polysyllabic forms of this class, they organize feet into trochaic prosodic words.
It was the Anglican bishop and grammarian Robert Lowth in 1752 who first called what had been the genitive case the "possessive.
Various opinions have been passed on the origin of the Uralic genitive and accusative.
The Oscan form pedu, identified as genitive plural (p.
Note, finally, that the preferences for the two genitives in the tested contexts for both ganging-up and counting cumulativity are not meant to be absolute but only hold for the contexts tested.
Post-genitives with possessive pronouns are, in fact, far more common than those with genitive nouns (Johansson forthcoming), presumably because there is no alternative construction (6) and because the use of pronouns is perhaps the most economical means of presenting given information.
This example also illustrates the fact that only CS genitives, and not free genitives, pass their [def] value upward.