genitive

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genitive

(jĕn`ĭtĭv) [Lat.,=genetic], in Latin grammar, the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 typically used to refer to a possessor. The term is used in the grammar of other languages, but the phenomenon referred to may not closely resemble a Latin genitive; thus a Latin genitive will be translated by a number of different cases in Finnish. Such forms in English as his and father's are said to be genitive, or, more often, possessive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let us consider the following examples (in the varieties we will deal with, genitive Layer II markers are -ker-/-kr-/-k-), that show different genitives of raklo 'boy' and rakli 'girl'.
2: "A species-group name, if a noun in the genitive case formed directly from a modern personal name, is to be formed by adding to the stem of that name -i if the personal name is that of a man, -orum if of men or of man (men) and woman (women) together, -ae if of a woman, and -arum if of women; the stem of such a name is determined by the action of the original author when forming the genitive".
Verbs of ruling, for example, take genitive objects; verbs of fearing may appear with the ablative.
For example, OKTAHA is the genitive form of the Russian word for "octane", and according to the US Geographic Names Information System is the name of a populated place in Oklahoma.
Conversely, and more importantly for this article, the specifier function is not always filled by determinatives; it can also be filled by embedded NPs, usually GENITIVE (5) (e.
Ergative markers of genitive origin are common in ergative languages (e.
The eleven 'semantic' case forms of an Estonian nominal (illative, inessive, elative, allative, adessive, ablative, translative, terminative, essive, abessive and comitative) are all based on the corresponding genitives, as illustrated in table 3.
3% of the explicitly marked genitives during the period from the emergence of the genitive until age 5.
Some language experts estimate that only 40 percent of the genitives are strictly possessive.
for its grammar, but I fancy the Romans were more concerned with the genitals than the genitives.
As genitives typically present given information, pronouns are a natural option: